Academic Dishonesty In Schools

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When coming through the public school system, we often find that students are trying to find ways around actually doing the work, and as teachers (or future teachers in my case) we want to know what drives these students to the point where they can justify academic dishonestly. There are common associations with academic dishonesty students who work part time jobs, students who are only focused on college acceptance, and (at higher levels of education) students who are just simply not prepared. In today’s public school system students are being given the opportunity to justify academic dishonesty because they are overloaded with work, not being prepared Higher Level Education, and are being judged for college acceptance based off a number (otherwise …show more content…
The students that don’t graduate, will have a negative effect on the school report card. This can lead to schools losing funding and accreditation. Cornelius Lee conducted a study on NCLB in lower income schools. His results proved that students were passing classes due to the fear of the school losing funding. “For many urban districts, the data was extremely sobering because, when disaggregated, the data uncovered a large gap in the academic performance of black children from low-income backgrounds and their more affluent white peers” (Lee). This also puts a pressure on teachers to make sure students pass classes. Now, No Child Left Behind (NCLB) has been overturned by a new national standard, but this raises the question of how many students passed classes that they should’ve failed because teachers were afraid to fail …show more content…
As I stated earlier, taking these kinds of classes also creates more work for the students because of the added homework time. At the same time, students are discouraged from taking extra-curricular activities because they do not offer the extra GPA points that the honors and AP classes do. This creates a continuous cycle of to take or not to take the extra-curricular activities, because of all the push to “be involved” in other activities but at the same time, not take into consideration that these activities might affect the GPA that has such a large weight on college

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