The Prince And The Pauper Character Analysis

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He must hurry back to the castle, to his rightful place as heir to the throne. In The Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain, two identical boys from completely opposite families take on each other’s roles. One, a peasant named Tom Canty, assumes the role as prince. Tom wishes to see a real prince that he has heard about from stories. Whilst Prince Edward Tudor, the king’s son, becomes a pauper. The youth wants with all of his heart to swim, foot race, and the other typical boyish activities of which he has so long been deprived. They agree to switch in hopes of fulfilling their dreams. This helps to transform the king’s son into a mature young man. At first Prince Edward demonstrates the vices of domineer and haughtiness but eventually changes …show more content…
After the switch, the king’s son, wishes to establish justice for his friend, Tom who was ill-ly treated by the royal guards. However, Prince Edward, forgetting the peasant clothes upon him, yells at the guards to open the gate for him. Instead of asking kindly, he rashly commands them. Later, still amongst the poor, Edward Tudor forces his way through the crowd after the death of his father, the king; he cries out in irritation that the English folk must punish the mock prince, Tom, in the parading ceremony. Fortunately, a man, Miles, rescues the poor youth from the clutches of the crowd but is not rewarded. Prince Edward treats Miles as if he is a servant. The domineering boy commands the man to undress him, bathe him, and bring him his necessities such as a towel after a wash. Prince Edward exhibits his authoritarian trait as he directs guards, citizens, and …show more content…
Early on after the switch, Prince Edward journeys the streets to his temporary home in Offal Court, which was previously Tom Canty’s. The true prince conceitedly declares who he is, the king’s son. The neighborhood boys jest him, and Edward becomes subject to their blows. Eventually Prince Edward arrives at his destination, the Canty home. Too tired to protest against the foul straw as a bed, the youth fell into a slumber. Arising in the morning, conscious, the arrogant boy says to himself that he is, “prisoner in a den fit only for beasts.” Rather than being grateful for the roof over his head and a spot to rest, he is haughty. A prince, next in line for the throne should not have to lie on the floor amongst the poor. He should have a great fluffy bed with curtains not this disgracefulness. Prince Edward is rescued away from the clutches of the Canty’s by a righteous man, Miles Hendon. The boy is not gracious to Miles but rather arrogant instead. The prince considers himself to high up for others to eat with him; this rule applies to all, even to the man who saved him, Miles. Surely he would not wish to disrespect the monarchy, to have the audacity to sit in a royal’s presence! Always, the prince demonstrates his arrogant

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