The Primary Argument And Deciding For Citizens United V. Federal Election Commission

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The primary argument and deciding factor in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission (2008) was that Citizens United’s First Amendment rights were violated. The Supreme Court is held accountable towards upholding the constitution and upon scrutiny of all relevant rulings, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Citizens United (Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 2008). The procedure of the Supreme Court’s ruling was a series of addressing previous held court precedents, including the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, Austin v. Michigan Chamber of Commerce, and McConnell v. Federal Election Commission (Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 2008). Ultimately, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Citizens United in a 5-4 ruling while establishing precedents against these previous rulings (Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 2008). The Supreme Court overruled Austin v. Michigan Chamber of Commerce, thus removing the ban on corporate expenditure (Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 2008). Faced with the previous ruling, the Supreme Court justified their decision by claiming that differentiating the freedom of speech of individuals from corporations and unions was unconstitutional. In addition, the Court ruled that corporate expenditure on political candidates or parties does not equate to the future prescience of corruption in those candidates or parties (Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 2008). The Court also…

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