Kennedy Foreign Policy Analysis

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The American foreign policy has become passionate response to the uncertain and the fast changing world. Their motive is to observe that their national interests are support in conjunction with those of other countries can be achieving international goals almost in all accept, this able either business at wide or diplomatic relation. The major and the basic national interests of US are to discourage and reduce the threat of chemical and nuclear weapons assault on US forces in different foreign countries thus ensuring subordination in shaping a successful international system
A Unit State of America Presidential doctrine is fundamentally draft goals of the current United States President and his key objectives in regards to foreign affairs.
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In Kennedy’s speech he advised “Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, in order to assure the survival and the success of liberty” (state.gov). In the same address to the people of America he asked the people to adhere and assist in "a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease, and war itself”, (state.gov). One can really begin to see the Cold War mindset of us-versus-them that came to govern the Kennedy administration in the President’s Inaugural speech. But in October of 1962, the Kennedy Administration found itself up against its most serious or major foreign policy crises yet. The leader of the Russians, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev wanted to strengthen his relationship between the Soviet Union and Cuba (under leadership of Fidel …show more content…
It seems as though all of the foreign policies or doctrines of these three presidents revolve around the threat of communism, hard working to prevent the spread of it and exacting the measures the US of America should present to prevent it. The main focus of the Eisenhower Doctrine’s was on providing armed and financial support to nations opposing Middle East communism, along with trying to increase the movement of trade from the U.S. into Latin America. On the other hand, the Truman Doctrine did so by offering support to countries opposing communism in Europe. In following, the Kennedy Doctrine was made up of the same intentions, but was more driven to intercede communism and the Soviet effect on Cuba following the Cuban

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