The Prehistory Of Home Analysis

Improved Essays
Jerry D. Moore’s novel, The Prehistory of Home, provides information of archaeology through the use of one central theme: the home. Moore does not simply describe different excavations, he discusses the journey of the human experience expressed by archaeological dwellings and artifacts. The Prehistory of Home supplements Anthropology 145, World Prehistory, by discussing the development of human society through the examination of the home.
The central purpose of this course is to observe the development of human society and culture from the time of hunter-gatherers to the development of agriculture and sedentary farming villages. Throughout the course we have discussed the effect of climate change on anatomically modern humans and how it has led to the development of new technologies and innovative tools and weapons. We also considered questions related to the domestication of plants and animals around the world and how political power lead to the rise of chiefdoms and states. Most of humans’ time on Earth has not been recorded and studying prehistory and archaeological sites, especially homes, allows us to recover ancient lives and explore what it means to be human. The Prehistory of Home was a successful reading assignment for this
…show more content…
Throughout The Prehistory of Home, Moore was able to highlight certain aspects of Life Prehistory by discussing the significance of archaeological dwellings to the humans who lived there. The book supplements and reinforces what we learned in the course making it a worthwhile reading assignment. The key concepts within the course are prevalent in the novel, however the book does not replace the information taught in the

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    He has published over 70 articles and 12 books that show or help explain how global warming is changing mother nature. He started college as intending to major in journalism. Later, he switched to geology because he realized he could make a living studying nature. His involvement in global warming was through the theory of community dynamics were driven by the climate changes that resulted in ice ages or by human interactions. His future work is aiming to build a smoother connection between paleoecology and ecology and how they are used in predicting the effects of future global changes.…

    • 1004 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The term evolution comes from the idea that biological species, to include humans, have changed over time and have given growth to other species that can be traced as far back as the ancient Greek philosophers. Societies present day knowledge of evolution began in Europe in the late 1700s, but ideas began to shift in the late 1800s, when scientists were starting to recognize fossils as the remains of creatures that once existed on earth. Beforehand, scientists had been under the assumption that fossils were the remains of deformed individuals of existing species and were simply just “tricks of nature.” (Book, 47). Scientist George Culver felt the apparent reasoning behind fossils was due to the earth undergoing a succession of global disasters, e.g. floods, earthquakes and changes to the earths crust.…

    • 879 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Eames House Analysis

    • 1664 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The Eames House was originally part of an architecture program called the Case Study Houses headed by John Entenza, the editor of Arts and Architecture. The idea was to create a home for a specific clientele influenced by the post-war modern world using materials and techniques derived from the experiences of World War II. The Eames’s plan for the house was designed to adapt accordingly to its surrounding environment, creating a space where human civilization and nature coexists harmoniously. The visitors enter into a new ecological setting when they visit the house and are presented a unique vision of human life and the world at large, filtered through their understanding of the behavior and orientation of objects. The objects themselves also enter into a new ecological setting, one that is incapable of absolving itself from human life and experience due to a structured life-and-work model of their presentation.…

    • 1664 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In order to make series continue, plants had some certain gene mutation to adapt to the changed climate, and this is the result of plants adapted to the change of environment. Mass propagation of annual plants created possibility for the origin of agriculture. From the perspective of breeding of plant species along with climate change, the author illustrated that the origin of agriculture could not be separated from certain climate conditions. In conclusion, it is no doubt that there was an extremely close relationship between climate change and the origin of agriculture. Historically, dramatic climate change had occurred repeatedly, and YD was only one of those regions.…

    • 1080 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He hasn’t solved his experiment fully yet but, Ian Miller has contributed to science today. His first contribution is that using fossils can help determine past climates. He built upon that idea that fossils can make past climate and ecosystem predictions because he found the mean annual temperature in his experiments and experimented with the animal fossils found (DMNS). He uses fossil leaves by seeing if they have foraminifera which can tell the ocean temperatures. He can see if they have dirt residue or a different shape to help determine the climate (Nature).…

    • 1245 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Archaeology helps us understand, not only when and where people lived on earth, but also why and how they have lived. This examines the changes and causes of changes that have occurred in human cultures over time. It also seeks patterns and explanations of patterns to explain everything from how and when people first came to inhabit the Americas (Schuyler, Robert L., 1988). Unlike history, which relies primarily upon written records and documents to interpret great lives and events, archaeology allows us to investigate far back into the time before written languages existed and to glimpse the lives of everyday people through analysis of the things they made and left behind (Schuyler, Robert L., 1988). Archaeology is the only field of study that covers all time periods and all geographic regions inhabited by humans.…

    • 1499 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Shapin throughout the book explores the many changes that have occurred and molded the modern world and the manner by which people have taken them by proving that science knowledge relies on history and is powered through social interaction and the philosophy of science. Has a professor of History of Science at Harvard University. He has written many books including A Social History of Truth: Civility and Science in the Seventeenth-Century England (1994), The Scientific Life (2008), and Never Pure (2010). Critics of the The Scientific Revolution and some of his writings argue that being a historian he concentrates more on the manner in which natural philosophers comprehend themselves to be building knowledge, than concentrating on the worth…

    • 728 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    John Harris

    • 1283 Words
    • 6 Pages

    “It’s the first permanent museum exhibit to trace mammal evolution – from the extinction of large dinosaurs to the rise of humans – within the context of epochal changes in the Earth’s geology and climate.” That is the summary Dr. John Harris, lead curator for the Age of Mammals exhibit at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles, gives about the exhibit. While to some, this description may seem vague, the museum sees it as a way of focusing on “telling a more complicated, ‘big picture story’ of mammal life” (NHM.org, Age of Mammals). However, in choosing to look at the bigger picture, the Age of Mammals exhibit loses organization and key details of evolution. For the most part, the exhibit displays Dr. Harris’ message well. The majority…

    • 1283 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Reflection On English 102

    • 1124 Words
    • 4 Pages

    By reflecting on my work this semester it has helped me identify what I can work on to help me become a better writer. Ending, whether it be online work or drafting a paper, I used not only the writing center to study but also the libraries online database to give me some credibility. Sometimes studying at the house is too noisy to study so working at high tech 1 has helped…

    • 1124 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Prehistoric People Essay

    • 817 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The remains can include buildings, artwork, tools, or pottery. Archaeologists look at the surrounding of the remains to see how the remains were used. Americans and Europeans consider archeology a branch of anthropology, which is the scientific study of human culture. They search information about how, where, and when cultures developed. They want to know why major changes occurred in certain cultures like why did ancient people started farming instead of continuing to hunt or why people built cities and set up trade routes.…

    • 817 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Great Essays