The Power Of Morality In The Screwtape Letters By C. S. Lewis

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Motive lies behind every action we take, and can often cause an action that is seemingly good to become immoral. The motives behind our beliefs are no exception, and as a result Christians are subject to immoral Christian belief; an immorality that lies in the motive and not in the consequence. When one devotes oneself to Christianity under desires other than to seek the truth and find God, the faith loses its validity and becomes one of mercenary affairs instead of Godly affairs. These desires take many forms and are laced throughout C.S. Lewis’ writings Throughout The Screwtape Letters, Lewis most explicitly states the desire to bolster a cause and rally a group together as an illegitimate motive for adopting Christian ideas. Lewis makes …show more content…
One who avoids searching for the truth in Christianity cannot really practice it; without believing in the Biblical story he loses Jesus’ saving power for his broken life. The Bible makes this idea very clear: Acts 16:31, John 5:24, and many other verses testify to the saving power of believing in the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and verses such as John 14:6 maintain that Jesus is the only way to this salvation. The significance of this idea is that a person entering or maintaining a Christian faith for reasons other than practicing his belief cannot call himself Christian, and cannot benefit from Jesus’ redemptive power. Hope is not fully lost for those who enter Christianity by these motives, …show more content…
I am afraid that, because of my improper desires, I have become the man Lewis describes as “shirking”, as I no longer search for the truth of Christianity lest I either discover it to be false and lose the faith I value so much or discover it to be undeniably true, which would require me to change my perspective on what my faith is for (“Man or Rabbit”, 111). However, it is evident that this way of living is completely ignorant of the Christian doctrine and of Lewis’ perspective on false motives. Thanks to Lewis’ God-inspired writing, I’ve come to terms with this selfish purpose for my life and have begun to notice how this faith, which used to be a part of my self, must now become integral to my whole self for it to be authentic. Christ died and atoned for our sins so that I could flee from the desires of perfection to pursue honest relationship with

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