Smooth Cruciate Ligament (PCL)

1101 Words 5 Pages
The posterior cruciate ligament(PCL) is one of, if not, the strongest ligament in the knee and often described as the “primary stabilizer of the knee”(emedicine, Charles S Peterson, MD). While this is not one of the more common of the 4 stabilizing knee ligaments, it serves a great purpose. The posterior cruciate ligament is twice as strong and twice as thick than it’s “sister” anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The PCL is extends from the lateral surface of the medial femoral condyle to the posterior aspect of the tibia. The term cruciate translates to “criss cross” which describes the PCL and ACL. Due to it being posterior and the ACL being anterior, the two resemble an x when in the anterior anatomical position. The PCL is the primary restraint …show more content…
Treatment of PCL tears is named differently per examiner, but is made up of the same concepts. One examiner may classify it by grade I, II, or III, or as A, B, or C. Grade I(A) being the tibial plateau maintains an anterior step-off, and grade II(B) being the anterior border of the tibia translates 5 to 10 mm and sits close to the femoral condyle(the bottom round part of the femur), and grade III(C) being the anterior border rests posterior to the femoral condyle and has a translation of more than 10mm of translation(Aspetar Sports Medicine Journal, Philippe Landreau). Grade I and II are commonly diagnosed as partial tears while grade III is a complete tear of the PCL. Grade III tears are usually associated with additional injury to other aspects of the knee and it is recommended to repair or reconstruct all ligaments whereas grade I and II, when acutely isolated, can be typically be treated non-operatively(British Journal of Sports Medicine, George …show more content…
In a clinical case by Scott T. Doberstein, the athlete being assessed was diagnosed with a PCL sprain to which they refused to see a physician for a definitive diagnosis due to the lack of knowledge of PCL tears. This caused a lack of going to the full extent of rehabilitation measures. PCL tears are often overlooked or diagnosed incorrectly as ACL tears. PCLs that are treated acutely and correctly have good outcomes. Most isolated PCL ruptures that are treated nonsurgically can typically return to normal activities in 3 to 6 weeks. PCL tears that are conjoined with additional tears and are treated surgically have a recovery timeframe of 9 to 12 months. Proper rehabilitation and diagnosis can aid in the recovery time. However, non treated PCL tears can cause instability and chronic arthritis, instability, and stiffness. While PCL’s are commonly not preventable and are caused by accident, some prevention measures are having good strength, flexibility, being careful and controlling of your body to ensure hyperextension doesn’t occur, or wearing a knee brace. Taking the proper steps to diagnose, treat, and prevent PCL tears will help the patient to exceed in their

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