The Pedestrian Ray Bradbury Analysis

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Ray Bradbury is an American author who through his many years has been successful. He has been popular over the many years by using elements. Similarly, his writing appeals to people who have interests incorporate futuristic world. "The Pedestrian" in particular is one short story Bradbury's known for. The story is about a man is 2052 where it is normal to stay inside using the Internet. While writing this short story, Bradbury used multiple different, unique methods to enhance the effect of his writing. These methods include literary devices, setting, and symbolism. Bradbury's choice to use of literary devices has an impact on the success of creating a negative view of technology. He uses the literary devices personification, simile, …show more content…
Mead. While Mr. Mead is conversing with the driver less car, he declared, "Wait a minute, I haven't done anything" (19). Bradbury portrays Mead's outrage for the police accusing him of having "regressive tendencies. " Notably, this helps show Mead's dislike for technology by displaying that he is not conforming to society around him that expects him to blindly follow the machines. Similarly, as Bradbury uses personification to show Mead's negative view of technology he also uses similes. While using similes, he makes comparisons between negative objects to exhibit how technology is dreadful for society. Mead determined, "The tombs, ill-lit by television light, where the people sat like the dead, the gray or multicolored lights touching their faces, but never really touching them," furthermore, insinuating that humanity, with the evolution of technology, has lost its sense of compassion for creativity and communication (14). Not only does Bradbury choose to utilize the literary elements personification and simile, but he also decides to apply metaphors to his writing to further its success. He used metaphors to make a comparison …show more content…
While Mead is walking down the road, he proclaimed that, "He would stand upon the corner of an intersection and peer down long moonlit avenues of sidewalk in four directions, deciding which way to go, but it really made no difference; he was alone in this world of A.D. 2053, or as good as alone, and with a final decision made, a path selected, he would stride off, sending patterns of frosty air before him like the smoke of a cigar" (1). His description of the road helps to express a mood of isolation by communicating how there are no people there in sight, and that is would not matter which way that he goes because there are no people anyway that he travels. "He stumbled over a particularly uneven section of sidewalk. The cement was vanishing under flowers and grass" (8). The reader can then make an inference that Mead is alone and isolated because the sidewalk's description of being decayed that suggests it has not been used in years. Consequently, Bradbury's choice to use the description of the setting helps enhance the mood of

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