Conformity In Hedda Gabler

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The idiosyncratic nature of Hedda Gabler arouses both scorn and sympathy all throughout the play. In Henrik Ibsen’s skirmishing and conflicting play, Hedda Gabler delineates the double standard of society as well as simple human self-interest, all while dealing with the corruption relationships, the struggle of resisting conformity, and etc. Her altercations she encounters with characters on the outside realm serve as a direct representation of her inner conflicts. This is evident based on the time period and unique character background; eventually creating an environment leading her to challenge and pursue a path of rebellion. The path of rebellion is a sign of being trapped in societal measures. The sympathy lies within her coerced conformity …show more content…
All throughout the play, all conflicts have represented her rebellion against this. The dissatisfaction of her marriage can easily be seen as an act of rebellion. Women around this time are expected to marry instantly, but once Hedda came to an epiphany in a conversation with Brack, the ambiance of their marriage shifted into complete upheaval. “I know of no reason why I should be happy-do you?”(Ibsen, Act 2). This statement from Hedda is a clear confession to Brack about her dissatisfaction with her marriage with Tesman. Not only referring to her marriage but also her life desires. She desires freedom yet, tries to fit in societal standards, which clearly illuminates more conflict. The contradicting motives cause a tremendous amount of hullabaloo throughout the play. Scorn can be seen when she undermines her husband as well as her expected child. “ Ive no aptitude for any such thing, Mr. Brack. No responsibilities for me, thank you!” (Ibsen, Act 2). This is her reply to Brack when accused of having a certain responsibility. Hedda 's refusal to admit that she has begun to fill-out physically hints at her problematic relationship with being pregnant also is an indication of inner frustration. Her struggles in admitting to this may be seen as scornful but when looking at why she doesn’t, sympathy can be carried as

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