The Pail Canon Analysis

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The Pail canon
I always founded that the Buddhism story is very interested and inspirational. The story about the the parable of the person with the arrow points out that when asking a question, we shouldn’t just look into detail but a big picture. Otherwise we could lost the essential meaning of escaping from suffering. My uncle once tells me that we human shouldn’t have any annoyance or irritability of everything, because thats all about attachment to something, and lead to bad karma. Therefore, the story of the parable of the person with the raft and snake teach us that we should know that even the good things should be abandoned, not to mention the bad things.
Jataka Tales
When talking about the six realms in Buddhism, from the highest
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In the Pali Canon, it talks more about Buddha’s teaching in either Fable story forms or the real lecture they had in past gathering. It is centered by Sakyamuni Buddha’s teaching about Dharma and other rules. And when it comes to the Mahayana, even though they still practice the idea of Sakyamuni Buddha’s teaching, they have a difference in Bodhisattva ideal. In general, a Bodhisattva is anyone who have great compassion about all living, and who practice Dharma to follow the path of Buddhahood. In the universe (Buddhism explanation), there are trillions or even more Buddhalands, and on these lands, there are many Buddhas and Bodhisattvas as well. Each of them practice the Dharma, some of them would go down to human realm or other realms to teach about Dharma. Since I’m living under Mahayana Buddhism society, there are some Bodhisattvas I know: Avalokiteśvara and Kṣitigarbha. Avalokiteśvara could be the most famous Bodhisattvas in my country because everyone worship him or her. Avalokiteśvara appears in many Buddhism stories, most of the stories is about him or her compassion to anything. For the Kṣitigarbha, from what I know about Kṣitigarbha would be: One time, Kṣitigarbha went down to the Hell realm, and he or she saw the terrible scenes in hell, and Kṣitigarbha make a wish due to his or her compassion, “If Hell is not empty, I would never become a

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