The Ox-Bow Incident Essay

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The Ox-Bow incident is a book that portrays life in the dark-side of the west. A cloudy story where thieves have taken the animals from a small cattle town Bridger’s Wells. Which then leads of the murder of Kinkaid which led to the lynching of three innocent men. In which the three innocent men were “guilty” in the eyes of the men in the valley. The three innocent people were hung without a requested trial. This novel as well speaks on the issues of law, justice, crime and punishment. There are large issues to be solved throughout the story. Beginning when Kinkaid had been murdered, the brooding mood increasingly escalates. The cold dark nights during winter increases the dull, dreadful mood for most of the action.

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This book is filled with many characters who go through emotional changes, and inquiry their own deeds and their beliefs. This book will have a reader think critically as well fill them with a beautifully illustrated story. As well the language and tone of the author’s writing make the reader feel a snip of the west in 1880’s. The characters speak with distinguishing genuine voices. This is a classic novel still has much of importance to say about the risk of punishment unchecked by the law.

This book can be a great book to read in law in school, not for the details of the law, but for how it shows the need for law and the result of ignoring it. As well the dangers of mob laws and a lesson that could be beneficial for today’s society. When the media often names people guilty of crimes before even given a chance to state their case in a court of law. As well speaks on a mob's mentality as it portrays the flow of the men's passions from forming a posse to making a mistake and an aftermath of guilt and regret. This novel is a must read, anyone who can get in reach this book should take the time to read it. The reader will not regret reading this book, instead, will fall in depth with the way the author depicts the

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