The Overeager And The Mastermind Manipulator Analysis

The Overeager and the Mastermind Manipulator During the twenties, the defined roles of husband and wife were meant to assist their partners to developing their better self; the ideal couple consisted of a witty, charming, entertaining, and welcoming husband, and a wife maintained elegance, dignity, loveliness, played the part of the perfect hostess, and provide support to her husband. Tom however, is a stark contrast with this idyllic dream; in fact, he appears to have little invested in fulfilling his role. Daisy on the other hand, fits the mold of the wife, even extending herself into the role of the man as well. The overextension can only be explained by Tom’s shortcomings; she adamantly tries to make up for his weaknesses, attempting to …show more content…
While Daisy is apologetic after disappearing to deal with Tom and his mistress during the Buchnan’s dinner party with Nick and Jordan, Tom has no apology in response to his unexplained exit, where he abandons the dinner, and “without a word went inside” (14). The lack of explanation left his guests confused, as well as his poor wife who, after realizing why her husband left, “suddenly… threw her napkin on the table and excused herself and went into the house” (14). Following that, Jordan makes it clear that Tom is fairly unashamed about having side-women, as she “thought everybody knew” (15) about his affair, showing that Tom really does not give a damn about what people think about himself nor Daisy. In addition to his current mistress, Tom also had the nerve to have relations with the “[chambermaid] in the Santa Barbara Hotel” (77), during the newly-weds honey-moon period. To continue emphasizing Tom’s destructive nature, Fitzgerald also uses specific phrases with negative connotations to describe him. For example, the “crunch of leather boots” (15) evokes rough, uncultured feelings. The contributing factors of the openness of Tom’s affairs with multiple women, his lack of grace and just persistent disrespect, as well as Fitzgerald’s choice in language to describe him …show more content…
The effort that Daisy puts into her marriage is admirable. From reassuming her bubbly self after having what can only be assumed as a shocking conversation with Tom about his mistress, despite the detectable “tense gayety” (15), or following her husband to Chicago after he cheats on her during their honey-moon, there is no doubt that she wants this marriage to succeed. It is blatant that Daisy is not happy with her current marriage; the lack of effort from Tom’s end combined with the amounting pressure put onto her to appear normal obviously will take its toll. In contrast, Tom is seemingly more cheerful than his wife, as he has invested into a mistress, yet has not asked for a divorce form Daisy. The only explanation is that he is content enough at home, because he has learned to manipulate his wife; Tom constantly tiptoes a line with Daisy who is dismayed with his actions, but desperate enough to attempt to save their marriage. By taking advantage of his wife’s good-natured naivety, he is balancing two separate worlds, while having the best of both. This is masterminded evilness, while brilliant, will could result in Daisy choosing between either her happiness or Tom’s desires. But as long as Tom puts his wants in front of his wife’s needs, Daisy does not

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