Dehumanization Of Power In 1984, By George Orwell

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Moreover, the leaders of these strong dictatorial patriotic countries are often times unstable, which “makes it possible for him to be much more nationalistic — more vulgar, more silly, more malignant, more dishonest — that he could ever be on behalf of his native country, or any unit of which he had real knowledge” (Notes on Nationalism). In essence, it leads to dehumanization of the individual and places the leader to believe he has an almost godlike power that can do no wrong, which explains Orwell’s last point of an indifference to reality (Notes on Nationalism). He explains that these types of leaders will see the wrong of what others do, but when it comes to their own actions, they fail to recognize their own faults. This is demonstrated when Syme says to Winston that the proles are not human. He views all the wrongs the Proles commit, yet fails to see his own faults.
In “Orwell and the Obvious” Michael Clune makes the
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. . . It is the only reliable ‘truth’ human beings can fall back upon” once totalitarianism destroys the space of civil society.8 “But,” she continues, “this ‘truth’ is empty or rather no truth at all, because it does not reveal anything...The book is not a transparent political statement. An attentive reading will show how 1984’s fictional political regime serves to render its surfaces opaque. From the historical experience of totalitarianism, Orwell has extracted the principle of the total artwork…The book is not concerned with exposing the harsh realities of truth, but what happens what the individual is deprived of their artistic senses.

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