The Nursing Theory Of Nursing

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Nursing started out as a very different job, in the 19th-century women where employees only until marriage then decided to stay home and be homemakers. There was no such thing as nursing theory, and physicians were entirely responsible for patient care of which usually took place inside of the ill persons’ home. Nursing was work for the poor, lower class, and servants, middle class educated women were not nurses (University of Phoenix, 2016, week one lecture). That was all before Florence Nightingale transformed nursing. Florence Nightingale, was the first nursing theorist although she did not call herself a theorist, in 1859 she wrote the book "Notes on Nursing, that focuses on the manipulation of the environment for the benefit of the patient" …show more content…
The first nursing science theorist were graduates of the Columbia program, some of the theorists were, Peplau, Henderson, Hall, and Abdellah. The theorist of this era was educating on a biomedical model that they based on what nurses do, their tasks (George, 2011, p. 5). However, according to Meleis (2007), Johnson who was another theorist from the University of California that believed “nursing knowledge is based on a theory of nursing diagnosis that differ from medical diagnosis” (George, 2011, …show more content…
In 1978, the Advances in Nursing Science published their first edition and the Journal discussed nursing science and theory and provided a place for disputes on theories in nursing. The 80s brought changes that expanded theories based on research. Some of the theorists from the 80s are, Johnson, "The Behavioral System Model for Nursing, Pender, "Health Promotion in Nursing Practice", and Benner, "From Novice to Expert; Excellence and power in clinical practice" (George, 2011, p.

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