The Neutrality Act Essay

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The Neutrality Acts were specifically tailored to keep the nation out of a conflict like World War I. If they had been in effect at that time, America probably would not have been sucked in, at least not in April 1917. Neutrality Acts of 1935 were important, because it kept the U.S. out of war and providing any country in war with supplies.
“Quarantine Speech”
President Roosevelt delivered his sensational “Quarantine Speech” in the autumn of 1937. Alarmed by the recent aggressions of Italy and Japan, he called for “positive endeavors” to “quarantine” the aggressors, presumably by economic embargoes. “Quarantine Speech” was important, because it called for Japan to be separated, after the Japan’s invasion of China.
“Cash-and-Carry”
The Neutrality Act of 1939 provided that henceforth the European democracies
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Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies was important, because their goal was to keep the U.S. out of the conflict.
Lend-Lease
The Lend-Lease Bill praised by the administration as a device that would keep the nation out of war rather than drag it in. Lend-lease was heatedly debated throughout the land and in Congress. Lend-Lease was important, because it was one of the most momentous laws ever to pass Congress and the first installment on an ultimate total of $11 billion.
The Atlantic Charter
The Eight-Point Atlantic Charter was accepted by Roosevelt and Churchill and endorsed by the Soviet Union. Suggestive of Wilson’s Fourteen Points, the new covenant outlined the aspirations of the democracies for a better world at war’s end. The Atlantic Charter was important, because it promised that there would be no territorial changes contrary to the wishes of the inhabitants.
Greer, Kearny, and Reuben James

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