The Negative Effects Of The Endangered Species System

1680 Words 7 Pages
Register to read the introduction… Federal officials claim that the dams within the Columbia River Basin do not jeopardize the existence of endangered salmon and new technologies can help ensure their survival. The administration assigned to this matter have laid out a strategy to balance the operation of dams along the Columbia river basin while maintaining the obligation to protect and restore the wild salmon population of that region. Under the Endangered Species Act, thirteen different salmon species are labeled as endangered while living within fourteen different dams along the Columbia River. Scientists estimate that each of the fourteen dams along the river kills up to fifteen percent of all salmon that pass through it. The federal administration's plan for the protection and recovery of endangered salmon species has been a major controversy among environmentalist in the area. Many feel the strategy is inadequate and poorly planned. In 2003, the plan was determined as violating the Endangered Species Act due to a lack of confidence that the actions would not be carried out or executed. With a new revised plan, there is certainty that the protection of salmon would be ensured while still allowing for use of the dams. Through this new plan, the negative effects engendered by the dams along the basin will be offset by the proposed protection …show more content…
With the federal efforts costing billions of dollars, these groups see them as harmful towards the already endangered species while wasting a great deal of taxpayer money. Under some perspective, the plan is seen as a step backward. It fails to ensure hopes of long lasting recovery goals and tackling problems engendered by the federal dam system. Ultimately, the criticism of the administration's plan is clearly a forefront controversy as the biological opinion claims that the federal dams are a permanent component of the Columbia River Basin. For this, the impact of the dam's existence must be ignored, and only the impact of the dams operations can be evaluated and criticized. Unfortunately, most if not all of the dam's negative effects on fish is a product of its mere existence. Very little of the effects salmon endure are a result of the dam's operational …show more content…
The process includes provisions for habitat restoration, hatchery production, and predator control. Nevertheless, the plan still calls for no significant changes to the region's federal hydropower system and ignores the four dams on the lower Snake River that do the most harm to the basin's endangered salmon. Moreover, the new plan does not include any increases in the amount of water spilled over the dams to improve critical downstream migration. In fact, the water that could be used as spill over water in efforts to aid the salmon in their migration, is claimed by the federal government to create even more hydroelectric power. Ultimately, this use of excess, spill over water seems unrighteous towards salmon in the Pacific Northwest

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