The Negative Effects Of Post Colonial Rule On Aboriginal Society

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One reason as to why post colonial rule is still affecting Aboriginal society is by observing the residential school system which continues to have tremendous negative effects on Aboriginal society. To understand how the residential school system has affected today’s Aboriginal society we must observe the harsh conditions many Aboriginal children experienced while in residential schools and link that to why crime rates and incarceration is higher in Aboriginal society then in the rest of Canada. The European settlers who colonized Canada and with the help of the Catholic church created the IRS system to systematically destroy the Aboriginal culture by coercive practices (MacDonald 2014: 308-309). The IRS system was set up by European settlers …show more content…
The continual violence that Aboriginal children have experienced in residential schools has made it a normal part of their life where they cannot differ from right and wrong and this is why suicidal behavior, poverty, alcoholism, and family violence are frequent in Aboriginal communities; all of these illnesses have a direct correlation with the IRS system in Canada (ibid 19). The residential school’s system in Canada had a huge impact on children’s parents who attended residential schools because they carried on the abuse to their children, sexual abuse was common in household of Aboriginal communities (Grant 1996: 260). Many of the hardships that Canadian Aboriginals have faced are linked with the abuse that children experienced while in residential schools. Also the opinions about Aboriginals in Canadian are mainly focused on stereotypical bias whereas many of us don’t know that the reason that many Aboriginals experience poverty, alcoholism, violence, and increased incarceration is because of post colonial rule and in particular, residential …show more content…
The residential school system did not only lead Aboriginals to behave more violently but also it suppressed the culture and family life of the Indigenous community. The systematic discrimination that Aboriginal children faced in residential schools destroyed families in Aboriginal society, it broke apart the child and parent and violated the parent’s choice to make a decision on behalf of the child (Grant 1996: 233). Aboriginal children were many times only allowed to speak English and were beaten if they spoke their native language which is an example of how the European setters suppressed the Aboriginal culture (ibid 189). The role of language in a culture is the basis all teachings and learning on the oral tradition is that it transits the collective memory of the people (ibid 193). The children grew up losing their cultural identity of what it meant to be a native and were traumatized from these experiences. Sometimes the suppression of language and culture was so severe in residential schools that Aboriginal children were not able to communicate with their parents and and other Elders when they left Residential schools (ibid 193). Aboriginal children were

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