Frankenstein: The Nature Vs. Nurture Debate

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Frankenstein: The Nature vs. Nurture Debate
Pope John XXII once said, “The family is the first essential cell of human society,” this quote explains that society cannot function correctly if the individuals living in that society are not raised properly and in a loving family (Lamoureux n.pag). In the novel Frankenstein written by Mary W. Shelley, the “Monster” that Victor Frankenstein created was basically a baby born into an unloving family situation, which could have made him into the monster he was perceived as within society. It can be argued that all children are either biologically born good or evil or that they are culturally exposed to good or evil (a.k.a born as a blank slate). With this argument in mind, one could decide if being born into a family with certain virtues could affect a child’s growth and development and the decisions they would later make as an adult or if a child is born with the personality that they will always keep with them through adulthood.
Child development arguments all focus around the Nature vs. Nurture debate, this first started with the philosophers Plato and Descartes who suggested that some things are inborn. Sara Mae Sincero, the author of the article “Nature and Nurture Debate” and professional nurse that attended Far Eastern University working for Explorable.com, gave copious amounts of information for the nature side of the debate. For example, individuals who believe in the nature side of the debate believe that there is something called the “gay gene” which encodes into someone weather or not
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In the novel Frankenstein, there are many different reasons and occasions that could equally support either side of the Nature vs. Nurture debate. The reasons given give equal argument towards both side of the debate which makes it difficult to decide on one side. With this, the debate

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