The Importance Of The Naturalist Response To Good People

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Back in high school, it was very typical for me to be running late to school. I was also considered to be the “lead-foot” of the family when driving so needless to say, I would only ever be a few minutes late to school, if at all. During the spring of my junior year, I was having one of those typical mornings when something caught my eye alongside the road. I immediately began to slow down for what turned out to be nothing. As I was slowing down, a big black SUV came out of nowhere and pulled right out in front of me. I slammed on the brakes and watched them disappear over the hill ahead. Right then, it hit me that if I had not slowed down any sooner, I could have been in a very serious car accident. I believe it was God hastily intervening …show more content…
This can be a very difficult question to answer when trying to avoid minimizing problems others could be facing. The Naturalist response to why bad things happen to good people is mostly because they believe the universe to be a purposeless entity that does not care why things happen or who they happen to; they just happen and we are expected to deal with it (Carrier). This is not the case. In a Christian point of view, the universe has a purpose and it was created by God. We are all sinners where even the seemingly “perfect” individuals have done wrong or committed various sins. We ourselves are put into bad situations based on our own actions. If humans were completely pure and in perfect union with God while on earth, nothing bad would ever happen because we’d be perfectly following His plan. But because of free-will, temptation and the fact that we are imperfect beings, suffering is something we all have to experience. Sometimes these times of suffering are unexplainable but that does not mean they do not have a purpose. God does not allow for there to be any “coincidences”, nor the universe to function on a type of serendipity. Scripture clearly states that God “allows sinful humans to make mistakes and reap the consequences of those mistakes, but only a sovereign God, could also promise that He will make all things work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to His purpose” (Romans 8:28). Through God’s love for us, He can take even our mistakes and weave them together to fulfill His purpose and plan for

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