Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass Synthesis Essay

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Fredrick Douglas was born in Talbot County, Maryland in approximately the year of 1818. He was born into slavery and later in his lifetime he gained his freedom and became an abolitionist. Douglas wrote an autobiography of his life, a book named The Narrative of The Life of Fredrick Douglas. According to Douglas, the slaveholders Christianity was oppressive for enslaved people through the white’s interpretation of the bible and their hypocrisy.
The slaveholders interpreted the Bible in a way that suited them in the system of slavery. In his book The Narrative of The Life of Fredrick Douglas, Douglas states that it was a grave offense for people to teach slaves how to read in this Christian country 1. The white’s thought that it would not
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Douglas saw his master tie up a young lady and whipped her until blood was dripping. The master justified his act by quoting a passage from the scripture stating, “He that knoweth his master’s will, and doeth it not, shall be beaten with many stripes.”3 Christianity and the misinterpretation of passages in the bible allowed the oppression of slaves to go on for a very long time. The interpretation of the Bible reflects the interest of those who interpret it, and it was done so to enact cruelty upon millions of slaves. The Christianity practiced by thee whites did not allow for the happiness or optimism of slaves. Douglas explains the difference between religious slaveholders and those who were not religious, implying that the non-religious slaveholders were not as mean, bitter, hateful, or evil. “Another advantage I gained in my new master was, he made no pretensions to, or profession of, religion; … I assert most unhesitatingly, that the religion of the south is a mere covering for the most horrid crimes” (67).4 Slaveholders use of Christianity was evil and inhumane towards …show more content…
Douglas differentiates the Christianity practiced by the slaves, which he believed was true Christianity, and the “Christianity of the land.” Christianity in the south during that time has been changed by the whites to meet their interests and make freedom harder to achieve knowing that they would not allow slaves to learn how to read and write. Throughout the Book, Douglas points out the cruelty, brutality, and blasphemous act of religious white’s in the south. Slave masters would rape, abuse, and torture women, while still believing that is the Christian way, just as his master Mr. Wilson at St. Michael’s beat a young lady with heavy cow skin. For example, Covey claimed to be very pious while making women and men commit adultery so that he can breed slave (54).5 Covey thought he was a good Christian even though he uses trickery and deceit. “He seemed to think himself equal to deceiving the Almighty. He would make a short prayer in the morning, and a long prayer at night…times appear more devotional than he.”6 Covey was hypocritical to the point that he actually believed that he was a true Christian. In fact, one can say that covey as well as the other “pious” slave owners were slaves in a way towards their hypocrisy; a hypocrisy that was oppressive towards those who were

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