The Murders Of Jack The Ripper

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If you thought watching a couple seasons of NCIS or SVU, or any crime show for that matter, could help you solve a case, think again. The job is tough enough for those well qualified to work in the field, and even now, with all of the technological advancements and improved investigative methods, many murders go unsolved and killers escape. Can you imagine the difficult task authorities faced when Jack the Ripper loomed large in London? In the fall of 1888, otherwise know as the “fall of terror,” a series of horrendous murders occurred in Whitechapel, the east end of London. Whitechapel was known to be a poor, crime ridden part of the city, making it a safe haven for any criminal. Except Jack the Ripper, as he is popularly known, was no ordinary …show more content…
Due to striking similarities between the murders that started in the fall of 1888, authorities concluded that the killings were the act of a single man (Odell, 2006). There were many other murders that were believed to be connected to Jack the Ripper, but all who study Jack the Ripper are convinced of one thing: 5 of the same victims were murdered by the same killer (Keppel et al, 2005). To make the case more complex and confusing, there were copious amounts of letters sent to the authorities, many claiming to be by Jack the Ripper. Most have been declared as hoaxes, but a few have not been ruled out. One letter “From Hell,” came with a package that contained “half of the “kidne” from a victim that had been “prasarved” (Curtis, 2001). The fact that the kidney has been proven to be from Catherine Eddowes, one of the victims, validates the letters authenticity (Keppel et al, 2005). There is not much evidence that came from scientific findings, since much of the technology, methods, and tools available at the time were not advanced enough to help detect the killer (Gordon, 2003). Therefore, the chances of finding the killer were …show more content…
All of these attempts have failed miserably to draw any conclusive evidence. At most, Jack the Ripper is understood in a very rudimentary way. Modus operandi characteristics, defined as “the offender’s actions during the commission of a crime that are necessary to complete the crime,” have been analyzed extensively (Keppel et al, 2005). Analyzing the killer’s modus operandi gives us better insight into the killer’s psychology, therefore helping to narrow down a list of suspects. It is well known now that Jack the Ripper targeted poor women who often times made their money working as prostitutes (Warkentin, 2010). Another key characteristic is that most murders happened on the weekends, when there was more time available to those of the working class (Odell, 2006). These characteristics are seen as similarities between the targets of Jack the Ripper. Most modern methods cannot be tried because little to no physical evidence exists from the murders, thus evidence is insufficient to identify Jack the Ripper with 100 percent certainty. However, the marginal evidence that does exist is enough to point us in the right

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