The Murders Among Us Analysis

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The processes in which the Germans were involved in to overcome the tragedies of World War II were vast and long. There were many complications present when the war ended; Germans found themselves questioned politically and mentally by their own compatriots, as well as outsiders. This essay will argue that the film The Murders Are Among Us depicts the complications involved in the German process of “overcoming the past,” post-World War II, through its characters. In particular, this essay will cover the development and practice of this process by discussing the three main characters of this film, Dr. Mertens, Cpt. Bruckner, and Susanne. These three characters represent all three types of people living within Germany. They all have different …show more content…
Mertens complications with “overcoming the past” are enduring and he faces many demons, mentally, while trying to clear his conscience. This film depicts him as a man who drinks every night until he is inebriated. This is his way of “overcoming the past” at first. Dr. Merten eventually learns that his commanding officer is still alive and doing better than ever. He is a man who is frustrated at the fact that the very men who killed millions of innocent German/Jews are still prospering, and in various powerful positions. This correlates directly to the real complications that faced the Germans when they were trying to overcome the past. They were fighting to move forward, but the ex-Nazis, in the various power positions, were holding them back from taking that first step to “overcoming the past.” Therefore, many German citizens were trying to eliminate (get rid of; not kill) these ex-Nazis just as Dr. Merten in The Murders Are Among Us seeks his own justice on his former commanding …show more content…
Merten replies, “No, Susanne, but we have the duty to accuse, to demand atonement on behalf of millions of innocent people who were murdered in cold blood!” This is a thought provoking moment because one can see how this scene could correlate with the ever-questionable Nuremburg trials. The Germans wanted to accuse and prosecute, but the allies stepped in to make sure everything was set in stone. This would lead the German population into a standstill because of the strict policies put in place by the allied powers, which in turn would delay their progress and rehabilitation for “overcoming the past.” As stated by Konrad Jarausch, in After Hitler, “Upright Christians, untainted by affiliation with the regime, along with Social Democrats, who were ‘ready to clean house’ and would thus risk a new political start, were by contrast scarce

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