The Motivational Tribits

1473 Words 6 Pages
Register to read the introduction… Doug Lisle, in a recent documentary provides a historical view to our society’s current condition. He describes how our evolutionary instincts actually compel us as humans to seek the most energy output from food sources that require the lowest exertion of energy. So our instinct is to take in rich high calorie low nutrition foods because their excessive richness tricks humans into believing they are full of nutrition (Forks over Knives). Another view on the historical dietary habits of humans is given by Antii Sanjatilla in his book on “Major Historical Dietary Changes Reflected in the Dental Microbiome.” Using years of scientific methods, he shows how the appearance of the very bacteria linked to much of today’s cardiovascular disease was due to a dietary changes. This …show more content…
Lisle describes as the Motivational Triad, a trio of biological mechanisms, that nature has designed into every creature on Earth, so they can survive to pass their genes onto the next generation. The first leg of this triad is the pleasure seeking motivation. The two main sources of pleasure in any animal from the smallest paramecium to a great white shark are food and sex (Forks over Knives). Richer foods naturally excite our senses because they tell us they will provide the greatest sense of pleasure with the least effort. This served our ancestors well in assisting us to select calorie rich foods that required the lowest amount of energy to obtain, which contributed to our survival as a species. However, the unnatural richness created by high-fructose corn syrup and other additives, allows us to gain a sense of pleasure much greater than our ancestors (Forks over Knives). If this scenario sounds familiar it should. It is descriptive of addictive society. Just as drugs create a hightened sense of pleasure , these artificial additives do the same for the human …show more content…
The Meditteranean peoples, for example, emphasize vegetables, fruits, nuts, olive oil and grains, with only small amounts of meats and full-fat milk products(Hales 136). The research centered around this pattern of eating has even lead to a trend toward weight-loss based on the Meditterranean Diet Pyramid. When followed even loosely, this eating pattern has proven to reduce the risk of asthma, progressive lung disease, as well as cardiovascular disease (Hales 136). Even closer to home, these studies focusing on college students who choose to eat a vegetarian diet, found they are less likely to feel hopeless, more likely to get better grades, and even get more sleep than those who include animal based processed foods in their diets (Hales

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