The Morality Of Creson And Creon In Oedipus The King

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Register to read the introduction… “Creon thus serves as a pivot about which Oedipus turns in his contrasting phrases of self-confidence and abasement” (Kirkwood 70). He not only ignored others but even accused them of the crime. “Oedipus is proud and overconfident; he harbors unjustified suspicions against Teiresias and Creon” (Dodds 19). Rather than acknowledging the information of other characters, Oedipus was threatened by their attempts to help. “The suspicion is confirmed, the connection between Creon and Teiresias is established, and the existence of the whole web of enmity stands corroborated as fact” (Reinhardt 51). Oedipus felt that he did not need the other characters. It was his desire for the truth and his search; he did not want help from anyone else. Oedipus continued his path alone with the same intensity and desire for the truth that he had since the news from the …show more content…
We get caught up in the quest, it consumes us, and it becomes our central concern. Oedipus Rex was about King Oedipus quest to discover his origin. He needed reassurance, personally and as king. To discover this truth, Oedipus went to great lengths. Along his path, he received clues, direct and indirect, about his past. Yet, Oedipus desire for the truth was just as great as his blindness to the clues on his journey. Oedipus’ blindness is attributed to his tragic flaw hubris. This hubris led to his innate and eventually outward blindness, his eternal wandering of the earth and everlasting suffering. “He was suffering humanity personified” (Jaeger 103). His tragic flaw led to his downfall. An example of his hubris and blindness was in Oedipus’ dealings with the blind seer Teiresias, the wise man who knew the truth that he desired. His irreverence and ignorance caused the peaceful man to reveal the awful truth to Oedipus. The truth that Oedipus needed was finally …show more content…
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