The Morality Of A Loving Saint By Susan Wolf

1130 Words 5 Pages
Many philosophers and people around the world believe that being a moral saint, is something that should be a desirable goal for human beings. In an excerpt from The Journal of Philosophy, on page 116 of the textbook, the author, Susan Wolf, a Professor of Philosophy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, defines a moral saint as a person whose every action is as morally good as possible, and a person who is as morally worthy as can be. Wolf however, believes that moral saintliness, does not establish a model of personal well-being and shouldn’t be something that a human being desires or strives to become. The conclusion of Susan Wolf’s main argument in the article is that the Loving Saint, and the Rational Saint will lack, and/or …show more content…
A Loving Saint, as defined by Wolf, is someone whose happiness lies entirely in the happiness of others. On the other hand, the Rational Saint, as defined by Wolf, is someone who gives up their own happiness for the sake of other peoples happiness (117). The second premise in support of the conclusion is that, the Loving Saint nor the Rational Saint will obtain non-moral virtues, because it would be immoral to have these virtues (118). For example, since the Loving Saint finds joy solely in the happiness of others, then he would give up something and give it to someone else in order to make them happy. If he can gladly give something up, then he doesn’t truly know what it is like to love these things that he is giving up. And because of this, the Loving Saint lacks the existence of an identifiable, personal self, because he really doesn’t know what brings him true happiness. And for the Rational Saint, he would give away the item, not because he wants to, but because he believes he has to. He knows that these items that he is having to give up bring him happiness, but he denies himself of these opportunities that bring him …show more content…
The Loving Saint finds happiness solely in the happiness of others, and therefore doesn’t need these items for himself, because it isn’t making other people happy. Also, if the Rational Saint wants to be rich, but he knows he should donate his money to someone who needs it more than himself because it will bring them happiness, he will deny himself the opportunity of acting upon his true desires. But his true desires are selfish, and selfishness is immoral, and therefore should not be something that a moral saint does. These items conflict with the attainment of moral perfection, and therefore should not be desired. You do not need to be rich or have expensive, material items in your life in order to bring yourself true happiness. Being a morally good person will bring you happiness because you are practicing ideals that are believed to be something that will bring you happiness and content within your life, because it is the proper thing to

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