The Moral Code In The West Angel's House Of Cards

1189 Words 5 Pages
The moral code, or lack of one, in House of Cards is completely the opposite of the one presented in The West Wing. The Underwoods do nothing that is not of their own self-interest. In order to achieve their goals, every option is on the table, including theft, murder, and an abundance of lies. This all options philosophy is surprising given Frank’s wife, Claire, job as an environmental activist. Even when seeking to accomplish virtuous things, such as Claire’s clean water project, immoral practices are still used. The Underwoods are guided by the idea that anything goes in order to get to the top. Frank exemplifies this when making comments like “For those of us climbing to the top of the food chain, there can be no mercy. There is but one …show more content…
In The West Wing, a brokered convention is used to choose the Democratic nominee to succeed Bartlett. After giving a rousing speech, candidate Matt Santos won the nomination handedly. In the fourth season of House of Cards, a brokered convention is used to choose Underwood’s running mate. Through a series of shady back-room deals and plotting, the Frank’s wife, Claire is chosen. Even in the use of brokered conventions, the theme of the shows can still be seen. For The West Wing, the presidential candidate is chosen because he is the most inspirational, whereas in House of Cards, the candidate wins because of back room …show more content…
It recognizes the difficulties of the process, but gives up that with the right motivation and guidance most policy goals can be achieved. House of Cards on the other hand shows all of the negative aspects of politics. It gives doubt to some that the democracy that we thought we have is not all that wonderful. It is surely suspenseful television, but it paints a picture of the nation’s leaders that will only dismantle what respect they have for them. Political dramas play a role in shaping the understanding of American citizens on the political process and institutions. Even the portrayal of brokered conventions may now be important, with the relevant dilemma facing both the Republican and Democratic parties this year. It is for this reason that writers and producers must be careful to accurately and appropriately portray the political system as to not disrupt the necessary political processes. While capitalizing on people’s preconceived fears may be good for ratings, it doesn’t present a depiction of the American political process that will inspire a new

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