What Are The Causes Of American Imperialism

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Following the realization that the United States had already reached its goal of Manifest Destiny, the belief in the justification of the expansion of American domain throughout the North American continent, political leaders sought to discover a new way to magnify American power and influence within the world. Because of America 's acquisition of new territories through victorious wars and the successful overthrowing of political authorities, nations around the world began to decide whether to see the United States as an oppressive or humanitarian global power.
The explosion of the USS Maine, a naval battleship located outside of the major port city of Havana, Cuba, was not only one of the major causes of the Spanish American War, but was
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The Doctrine prevented the nations of Europe from interfering with American territory, and is often referred to as “the best known U.S. policy toward the Western Hemisphere,” warning “European nations that the United States would not tolerate further colonization or puppet monarchs” (Monroe Doctrine). The Roosevelt Corollary, created by and named after President Theodore Roosevelt, was added to the Monroe Doctrine to justify certain interventions by the United States. The Roosevelt Corollary allowed America to involve itself in Latin American affairs. Yet the people of Latin America resented U.S. involvement, or “Yankee imperialism.” Their animosity toward the US grew dramatically. By the turn of the century, “the United States… established an undisputed sphere of influence throughout the hemisphere” (“The Roosevelt Corollary and Latin America”).
There was considerable internal opposition to United States involvement, causing an increase in anti-imperialist groups who felt that “a self-governing state cannot accept sovereignty over an unwilling people. The United States cannot act upon the ancient heresy that might makes right” (Platform of the Anti-Imperialist

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