The Mongol Army

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The impact the Mongol army had on the Middle East Throughout history many civilizations have risen and fallen, from the Macedonian Empire lead by Alexander the Great to the Roman Empire that rose under the rule of Augustus. These great empires have conquered weaker civilizations to incorporate into their own or to destroy potential threats. In either scenario, these civilizations/religions have been changed for the remainder of their history. The period from the 8th century to the 13th century was known as the Islamic Golden Age. However, in the 13th century, Mongol empire marched on the city walls of Baghdad which marked the end of the Islamic Golden Age. The conquest of Baghdad by Hulagu Khan brought many changes to the Islamic world including …show more content…
Any civilization that saw the Mongol army approaching the had either two options: 1) surrender and submit to the will of the Khan army and pray that they leave after they have taken what they desire or 2) refuse the Khan army and prepare for war. The second scenario almost always was in favor of the Khan army. The Mongols were a walking natural disaster for anyone or anything in their path. The Mongols were able to change the history of any civilizations they came in contact with for the worse. After the death of Mongke Khan, Hulagu left Baghdad for Mongolia to select a new great Khan. Berke Khan had converted to the Muslim religion and opposed Hulagu. Eventually war broke out and put a stop the Mongol expansion into the Middle East. Eventually a powerful Khan made a political conversion to Islam as an act of peace. Before this Mongols that were stationed in southwest Asia had already begun to convert to Islam and were eventually absorbed into Persian and Turkish culture. Eventually the Islamic world turned to Tasawwuf. Tasawwuf is the soul of Islam. Its function is to purity the heart from the lowly bestial attributes of lust, calamities of the tongue, anger, malice, jealousy, love of the world, love of fame, niggardliness, greed, ostentation, vanity, deception, etc. Dr. Nazeer Ahmed states, “Tasawwuf was the dynamic force that rescued Islam in its gravest hour, conquered the Mongols and propelled the faith deep into Asia, and Europe. Today, it is in the spirituality of Islam that Muslims search for renewal in the face of a global challenge of an agnostic world civilization.”2 The impact of tasawwuf on subsequent developments in politics, music and culture. Millions of Africans entered Islam. A critical figure in this transition was Ibn Taymiyyah in the 13th and 14th centuries; Taymiyyah developed a conservative form of Islam that completely rejected both the philosophy and the entire field of

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