Leonardo Da Vinci Influence On Mona Lisa

1746 Words 7 Pages
One of the most influential and well known people in the history of humanity was a man who combined invention, art, nature, and science together in a way that would revolutionize how life and creation were perceived by everyone. Leonardo Da Vinci was responsible for these contemporary contributions that changed art and science for ever. Hundreds of revolutions had occurred before his time, however the way he perceived the world allowed him to experience life in a very different way from every one else allowing him to create a revolution of his own. Da Vinci, a legendary inventor, artist, and teacher, revolutionized how humanity as a whole perceives and thinks of the world by augmenting science, nature, and art to be fit into and molded by his …show more content…
Considered by most to be his magnum opus, the Mona Lisa is the ultimate culmination and amalgamation of art, science, and nature that has ever existed. The amazing piece only took Da Vinci four years to paint, although he would continue to add small touches and details until he died. Every part of the creation of the Mona Lisa contains nuance and special thought; even when the painting was just a wood panel, a thick coat of lead white was used instead of the normal gesso, chalk, and white pigment because Da Vinci understood this choice would convey the reflection of light better. The shadows on and under Lisa’s face were created by Da Vinci’s own combination of iron and manganese which allowed for the oil to be well absorbed and blended. One again Da Vinci’s obsession of drawing drapery is displayed in the Mona Lisa as her dress has many gentle waves and folds. His attention to detail and perfection awes the world to this very day with technology revealing hidden details in Lisa’s garment. Da Vinci painted details and patterns into her clothes that would later be hidden by other layers of paint, however even though the detail can not be seen, it can be …show more content…
Da Vinci was born out of wedlock between a somewhat well off father and a mother that was most likely a slave from another country. Since he was an illegitimate child, Da Vinci did not receive any regular education that would be normally given to children of his background. The only training he would receive would be from a commercial school of abacus leaving him to be mostly self-taught and a follower of experiencing and experimenting with the world around him. By examining his personal life, Da Vinci unintentionally makes a stab at education by simply existing. His life proves that education is not always necessary for success and even with the least amount of education one is not limited to what they can do. A bastard child with no formal education or learning becomes one of the most recognized and appreciated artist and scientist of all time. That in itself is a revolution. Da Vinci was unbound by the conventional thoughts and ideas that were commonplace in his society and this allowed him to explore the imaginary and the surreal. Unbound by logical scholarship and edification, Da Vinci was able to traverse a creative and hypnagogic landscape that would have most likely been desolated by a formal education. In his own right, Da Vinci unintentionally created an education revolution.

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