The Meaning Of Prerequisites By Matt Reed

989 Words 4 Pages
According to Matt Reed in "The Meaning of Prerequisites", he explains two types of camps involving the issue of prerequisite classes. You either agree or disagree with them. Reed starts off his essay asking the question of "Why should courses have prerequisites?" (Reed). Then reassuring some readers that he is not saying that some classes should not have prerequisites, just asking what the criteria should be for those courses (Reed). Reed offers the following idea, prerequisites can be viewed as a dirty word or the "academic rigor, academic freedom, truth, justice, virtue, beauty, and all that is good" (Reed). The author describes that there is too much of a gap in between the two camps, making it hard for either side to agree with the other. …show more content…
She explains that these materials covered in the general classes are a repeat of classes that have already been taken in high school. Students already "know how to write and organize an essay or have spoken in front of a classroom before" (Pracz). Pracz flashbacks to a time when she was in college, remembering she initially thought it was a "joke" with the useless general classes she was taking (Pracz). While students are in college, they do not give the same sort of devotion to these classes. "Professors, however, tend to teach the material as if everyone taking the class is planning on majoring in the subject" (Pracz). The effect of this is, students grades increasingly drop. Another major concern Pracz describes is how much money these general education classes will cost, nearly spending around $22,288.32 in two years (Pracz). Pracz concludes stating that "college should be a time spent focusing of and learning about what you're going to do for the rest of your life, not frantically trying to learn bits and pieces of every possible subject on …show more content…
The intended audience for this article was the general public. Reed speaks to the audience by giving examples of each side, so the readers can understand their stance. The writer seems to value providing information about this topic, so readers are more informed about why this is an issue in education. Although the author of this article is bias, because he agrees with one side more, I believe he can still inform the reader about the issue on prerequisite classes. He adequately deals with potential questions or concerns about this by giving studies and examples to back him up, and that is why the support given throughout is relevant to his

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