The Meaning Of Intelligence In Intelligence, By Oded Zipory

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The article “Intelligence”, by Oded Zipory, discusses the arguments to conceptualize a meaning for intelligence. Zipory includes biological and social factors that influence each theory, but he also addresses the main root that leads to these conclusions: inequality. In response to his work, I will compare his thesis to the what I have learned from his point of view and what I have researched and observed in personal experiences. Zipory does not propose a meaning for intelligence, instead he presents the concepts by other scholars that attempt to define our intellectual ability. However, we can draw our own conclusion from these points of views. Personally, I agree with the nonexistence of a superior intelligence for we all possess different …show more content…
Jacotot later instructs his students to read a bilingual version of a book and write a paper in French explaining their thoughts about the story. Students, without explanations from their professor, did a great job. Jacotot refers to this experience as a success on treating intelligences equally. According to him, the inferiority of a student is only reinforced by the reminding of his inferiority. In other words, it is reinforced when teachers emphasize on the imitation, memorization, and repetition of their knowledge to close the gap of information between them. Jacotot, by exposing his students to the need of obtaining a good grade on the assignment, they found ways to succeed on it by themselves. In my consideration, this is probably why many students are drained by school. Because they are reminded of their inferiority and forced to follow a program, their will to show their aptitudes decreases and they found themselves in the necessity to understand using imitation, memorization, and then repeating what they “learned”. Consequently, they are marginalized to an inequality where they become submissive of a superior …show more content…
The article “Cultural Perceptions of Human Intelligence”, by the University of Notre Dame, reviews how intelligence is perceived by different theory frameworks and by cultures in many parts of the world. They first talk about what culture consists about; it is compound by four main concepts: the customary behavior of a group of people; the code that includes expectations, emotions, and assumptions; artifacts, things that are value to a culture; cultural institution, religion, politics, and other social organizations. In order to interact in these factors, there should be a scene of intelligence. The cross-cultural studies of intelligence have presented then two views about the concept of intelligence: The Relativists and The Universalists’ perspective. The relativist argues that intelligence is relative; it is the combination of abilities to survive in a culture in the same environment and that the actions involved in this culture are carried out at different times by different groups. Unlike the relativist, the universalist argues that there are universal abilities to solve problems regardless of the environment and they are developed according to the ecological environment since we are species that adapt to fit in an environment. Nonetheless, all these theories discuss the same topic of intelligence inequality and equality within individuals. Assuming

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