The Matrix Dystopia

1752 Words 8 Pages
“This is your last chance. After this, there is no turning back. You take the blue pill—the story ends, you wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take the red pill—you stay in Wonderland and I show you how deep the rabbit-hole goes." This is a quickly discernible phrase for connoisseurs of the science fiction world; it is a memorable line from one of the most recognizable and celebrated sci-fi movies of the 20th century, The Matrix, which was written and directed by Lana and Lilla Wachowski. The movie is set in a dystopian future and revolves around the idea of a Matrix, a virtual reality created by an artificial-intelligence that humans grasp as true reality, because humans can’t discern between the Matrix and true …show more content…
I. apparatuses use the Matrix to quell humanity while using humans as energy generators. Like The Matrix, there are countless dystopia and sci-fi tales that warn the event in which our creations turn against us. This unsettling yet fathomable future, is growing in potential before our very eyes, but the vast majority of us turn a blind eye to it. When we imagine technological apocalypse, we imagine an explosion-filled, ludicrously dramatic fight resulting to the cruel enslavement of humanity. But this is too easily preventable, so technology most likely will take over in a more subtle, pragmatic way. Technology is a double-edged sword. Future innovations could change the lives of millions, possibly eradicating many world problems such as world hunger and poor sanitation or living conditions. But just as possible is the event of an apocalypse caused by technology. Therefore, although there are countless benefits of future technology, we must be aware of the dangers it could bring, such as unemployment, addiction, and advancement for the …show more content…
You most likely have seen articles on the internet about the negative health effects of technology. Some are outright false, such as the claim that exposure to technology leads to autism. However, other claims are completely true. Staring at a screen all day proves to be not just detrimental to eyesight and posture, but important brain functions. Nicholas Carr, the author of a New York Times bestseller and Pulitzer Prize finalist The Shallows: How The Internet Is Changing Our Brains, is a particularly vocal supporter of the notion that the technology is doing more harm than good to us. His words during a particular interview evinced his concern for this issue. He claimed that the Internet seemed to be preventing us from being able to think deeply or show the ability to focus. Carr viewed the Internet as “...a system that kept us in a state of perpetual distraction and constant disruption” (Gregoire). He also mentioned that “...psychologists and brain scientists tell us about interruptions is that they have a fairly profound effect on the way we think… [in the case of access to the Internet,] the price we pay for being constantly inundated with information is a loss of our ability to be contemplative and to engage in the kind of deep thinking that requires you to concentrate on one thing” (Gregoire). When asked about the technological impact on memory, he mentioned that “One study out of

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