The Matrix And Plato's True Self-Knowledge?

1016 Words 5 Pages
In the mind of philosophers, the idea of a true education is arguable. Throughout the centuries, multiple different philosophers produce a new concept of what true education is, for example, Plato and Descartes. Plato takes over Socrates work and keeps his legacy going in his writings. Additionally, the introducing of the idea of knowledge of the true forms and the necessity of knowledge of reality leading to a true self-knowledge. In the same way, “The Matrix” forces the main character, Neo to learn the reality which forces him to a true self-knowledge and an overall true knowledge of what he is presented with. Education as we know it is not true education in the philosophical form, but in fact is a sort of a “recollection.” The concepts brought …show more content…
In the twenty-first century human beings see education as the knowledge of math, English, sciences, and history. That is not the definition or idea of education to philosophers. Nevertheless, The Matrix and Plato open up the eyes of the audience, making them question, so what is true education? To have true self-knowledge, one must first be freed from the prison their mind is trapped in. This is seen in “The Matrix” when Morpheus and his crew open up the mind of Neo to see the true reality of his life. "I 'm trying to free your mind, Neo. But I can only show you the door. You 're the one that has to walk through it” (The Matrix). The true form of education within the movie is the knowledge of the truth. Moreover, Plato’s proper form of education is also the knowledge of the truth and knowledge of oneself. While searching for self-knowledge one is learning about their soul in previous …show more content…
For instance, in The Matrix, Thomas Anderson lives a double life. One as a working man and another as a computer hacker named Neo. The learning about the reality of the Matrix leads Neo to become who he truly is—the one. "Unfortunately, no one can be told what the Matrix is. You have to see it for yourself" (The Matrix). He is given the opportunity to understand his surroundings and takes it. Not knowing the reality leads one to be naïve and believe what one chooses to believe, rather than believing what is true. “I can see it in your eyes. You have the look of a man who accepts what he sees because he 's expecting to wake up. Ironically, this is not far from the truth. Do you believe in fate, Neo? (The Matrix).” When Neo finally reaches the knowledge of reality he unlocks the fact that he truly is the one and acquires a better self-knowledge. Meanwhile, in Plato’s mind knowledge of reality is necessary for true-knowledge because if one does know the truth behind reality he cannot know the true self-knowledge. There are three levels of reality and two of imitation: which imitates the imitation. The form: what something really is, the natural thing: which imitates the form, the work of art. “So, imitation is surely removed far from the truth. And the reason that it produces everything, it seems, is that it grasps only aa

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