The Managerial Concepts Of Quality And Total Quality Management

1203 Words 5 Pages
Quality of products and services has been paid attention by everyone more than looking at their price nowadays. According to the ‘sand cone’ model of operations excellence by Ferdows and de Meyer (1990), quality is the basic element of product and service, followed by dependability, flexibility and cost. Kelemen (2003) mentioned that there are two ways of looking at quality, by dividing it into managerial and critical perspectives. Total Quality Management (TQM) is a managerial approach aiming at achieving quality in a broad of sense. Juran (1992) stated that quality management aims at conducting the inherent managerial elements of planning, control and improvement. Continuous improvement (CI) is a core element of TQM, mentioned by Kaizen (n.d.). …show more content…
Most of the TQM literature emphasizes the central role employees have in the quality process. For instance, Oakland (1989) argues that there is no need to force the employees to pay attention on quality but they have to commit themselves to improve the quality of the products and services in order to achieve their self-fulfilment. Workers are motivated by extra responsibility, team work and involvement in decisions of TQM while BPR makes the employees scare of losing their job anytime because of the top-down approach (Hendrik, 2010, p.10). For example, it is very important to have high employee morale in the construction industry because employees don’t hesitate to move to other companies, which offer them higher pay. This is a common phenomenon in the construction industry. If an employee feels part of the team the employee will have more commitment and be more productive and show loyalty to the company. Employees will be proud in their work and it will improve quality standards. As BPR is using only top-down approach, employees may not willing to follow all the instructions given by the top managers and this leads to the reduction of the quality of products and services of the company. Blaire and colleagues (1998) argue that BPR reinforces the development of organisational control systems to ensure the workers …show more content…
TQM emphasis on the use of scientific knowledge. According to Sultana, Razive and Azeem (2009), the most important tool of TQM is statistical process control (SPC). For example, the manufacturing-based approach in managerial perspectives on quality implements SPC. Many faults and problems can be spotted and sorted in a shorter time. It enables workers to tell the difference between avoidable errors and unavoidable errors and track down the controllable problems (Kelemen and Mihaela, 1968). From these approaches, top management commitment, continuous improvement through scientific knowledge and employee involvement constitute the three fundamental pillars of TQM. Improved reputation is very important for construction companies due to the competitive nature of the industry. For instance, construction company with a good reputation has a distinct advantage over a construction company with a bad reputation and it makes a big difference when it comes to the tendering process. If faults and problems are spotted and reported quicker the faults and problems can be rectified quicker and therefore there will be less latent defects and the client will have more confidence or trust in the contractor. Besides, BPR does not use a SPC to control and organise the management but emphasis more on the enabling role of Information Technology (IT). IT can help to make the changes promoted by reengineering, and it can

Related Documents