The Man On The Twenty Dollar Bill Analysis

864 Words 4 Pages
The Man on the Twenty Dollar Bill The past and its people are often romanticized. One such character of early American history that was romanticized was Andrew Jackson. Yet author James C. Curtis does not romanticize Jackson’s actual achievements, and also tells of his faults and flaws in his book Andrew Jackson and the Search for Vindication. Curtis reveals Jackson’s participation in national events, his inconsistent morals and ethics, and the women most important in his life. Jackson participated in two wars that were of great national importance. Firstly, when Jackson was young he experienced first-hand the horrors of war during the Revolutionary War. Curtis explains that Jackson had always dreamed of being a solider, but never would …show more content…
Curtis explains that initially Jackson had no quarrel with the Native Americans because they never had harmed anyone in his family, but tensions between them and other westerners influenced his views (22). As Jackson grew older his words on Native Americans grew harsher and showed how he hated them for their disorder. Later when Jackson was a military man, he took to slaughtering so many Native Americans. He did this to the Creeks who had sided with the British and attacked Fort Mims in 1813 (Curtis 49). Yet during his presidency, when tensions with the United States and the Native Americans were high, Jackson said that “Indians are subjects of the United Stated” (Curtis 71). He wanted to put Native Americans under control of the central government so that both they and the white folks could …show more content…
The only achievements Jackson had were in his relationships with his mother and wife and in his victories in battle. Yet these achievements do no change how temperamental the man was or how all of his polices fell flat during his presidency. He did become a president of the United States but does it really justify his face being printed on our twenty dollar

Related Documents