The Maastricht Treaty

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Following the second world war, the European economy and infrastructure were severely devastated. Europe had the mindset of avoiding any further damage and deaths in their land. Leading them to begin moving forward towards a more peaceful Europe. Over decades of treaty making and attempts to collaborate with one another, eventually, the Maastricht Treaty was created in 1992. This new treaty was put into effect in 1993 providing unity to twenty-seven member states. Giving the world the birth of the European Union. Through the decades in the wake of WWII Europe has been in zero armed disputes. Their success with maintaining peace among each other was proving to work, yet, there is indubitably a lot more issues to resolve before a single, sovereign …show more content…
A substantial example of the deficiency of cooperation is the failed attempt to a European constitution in 2005. Signed by the then 25 member states in 2004 and later ratified by 18 members states it was later rejected by French and Dutch voters bringing the ratification process to an end. The importance of a stable constitution for a state to succeed is imperative. The reason for that being is the simple meaning of what a constitution provides, which is the body of fundamental principals a state abides by. This document is what finds the government. With the failure of the attempt to create the basic laws and citizen rights of the union has only prolonged the creation of the U.S of Europe. Following the rejection of the document, The Treaty of Lisbon was created on December 2007 and entered into force on December 2009. Intended to replace the Constitution the Treaty of Lisbon amended two European treaties that formed the EU. The Treaty of Rome, which established the European Community and the Maastricht Treaty. The Treaty of Lisbon also gave member states the legal right and procedures to leave the European …show more content…
However, the European Union has a long way to go to accomplish this goal. Due to the European Union being fairly new, it is expected to have major issues to work through before it can be known as a stable United States of Europe. Most importantly monetary and political integration cannot take into effect until these twenty-seven member states can all agree on shared policies. The structure still needs reevaluation for it to be a working program. The Structural democratic deficit results in the lack of interest of the people to have faith in their government. If the people aren’t expressing their opinion and more importantly if they are not being heard then how much of a democracy does the European Union really have. Furthermore, if member states are legally allowed to exit the Union in the result of the lack of a working constitution and nationalism, then how can the member states trust and have faith in a United States of Europe. Therefore, the hopes of a sovereign state are further rather than

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