The Lucifer By Philip Zimbardo Analysis

1586 Words 7 Pages
I’ll admit, I found this book very difficult to read, but not because of the vocabulary words or because it was a medium-sized book that from a distance can look long-winded to many people. It was very difficult to read the Lucifer Effects, by Philip Zimbardo because it made me angry, annoyed and mostly horrified. I wasn’t angry at the author, I was angry at humanity and how far they can get twisted in ideals, religion or just turning plain evil. I know that evil is out there, most people know that, that humans can become the very twisted and malevolent creature and be perfectly ok and justify their actions by saying the race deserved it, or it was for their . That human beings can become the things that go bump in the night. But knowing the …show more content…
Propaganda, it is used by military, government, or your local library to promote or advertise a cause. Something as harmless as a piece of paper can become a deadly weapon in the wrong hands. I understand the need to get the word out, about something passionate. But to spout that a race is bad and should be tortured or killed, locked away from the little ones, just so a leader can have a scapegoat to fit his almost narcotic-addiction to power methods is horrifying. Even within the pages of this book, the example that is most commonly used is WWII, the legal genocide of the Jews by Germany Nazi’s and Hitler, whom will forever be mocked (especially that stupid mustache and comb-over) is a prominent example of what happens in history when a leader with charisma and somewhat of a sociopathic/psychopathic tendencies gets into office. The government or a group with the right amount of charisma can turn you to think against anyone or race. Even groups, like the church, that no one really thought about going bad, uses advertisement to annihilate a race. Another example is the south, they used propaganda against the blacks after and during the civil war. (Zimbardo 8-13) This bundle of information also annoyed me, because even now cults use this method (flyers) to attract money and followers. Now, it is increasingly difficult to get the younger generation to even read much …show more content…
For some, it goes to their heads, and they tend to run rampant if allowed. Or they fall so deep they never crawl back out. The book, Lucifer Effects mention an experiment that shows that very statement to be true, that experiment was the Stanford Prison experiment. When I read about that experiment, my first thought was that I don’t think the author had control of that experiment. At least not completely, the guards were flush with the power going to their heads, constantly humiliating the prisoners whenever and however. It was twisted, especially with how well and deep they got into their roll that they even forgot who they were. That this was an experiment, not an actual prison. They had no right to do the acts that they had ordered the prisoners to commit. The author, Zimbardo allowed the guards to go too far, and the prisoners to fall too deep. (Zimbardo 146-150) I learned that if left alone that people’s mind can break, and eventually will become the thing they fought so much against. It angered me that the experiment even went this far in the first place. They were people, not creatures or little robots to be toyed and manipulated at

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