The Loss Of Morality In Elie Wiesel's Night

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In just over one hundred pages of sparse and fragmented description, Elie Wiesel’s Night conveys the unimaginable horror of the Holocaust while putting on display the loss of humanity that he was forced to bear witness to in Auschwitz concentration camp during the Second World War. Not only is Elie forced to watch the degradation of basic moral values and characteristics of his fellow man, but he is also left to question the morality of his own God. Even more horrifying, Elie is subjected to situations in which his own values falter when presented with certain situations. This especially occurs in those situations that endangered his own ability of self-preservation, despite his resistance to the stripping of his basic human values. [However, …show more content…
All [Elie] could think of was not to lose him.” Despite the threat of death that saturates this scene, humane behavior persists between Elie and his father and the familial bond is as strong, if not stronger, than before (as Elie wrote, “[My father] rarely displayed his feelings, not even within his family, and was more involved with the welfare of others than with that of his own kin,” prior to entering the concentration camp.) Within the unfamiliar and deadly parameters of this selection the father and son appear to seek mutual protection in the familiarity and comfort of established relationships. Other father-son relations are overcome by instinctual self-preservation, such as when Rabbi Eliahu is deserted by his son on the 42-mile run because his father was slowing him down. However, pertaining to that same run Elie states, “My father’s presence was the only thing that stopped me [from allowing myself to die]. . . . I had no right to let myself die. What would he do without me? I was his only support.” While many familial relationships begin to break down when confronted with …show more content…
. . . Why did I live? Why did I breathe?” His belief in an omnipotent, benevolent God is unconditional, and he cannot imagine life without this guiding divine power. Elie has grown up developing his faith around the principles of Jewish mysticism, a belief that everything is a reflection of God’s holiness and power and that this divinity touches every aspect of his daily life. However, Elie’s faith in the goodness of the world and the justice of his God are irreparably shaken, such as when Elie exclaims, “Blessed be God’s name? Why, but why would I bless Him? Every fiber in me rebelled. Because He caused thousands of children to burn in His mass graves? Because He kept six crematoria working day and night, including Sabbath and the Holy Days? Because in His great might, He had created Auschwitz, Birkenau, Buna, and so many other factories of death? How could I say to Him: Blessed be Thou, Almighty, Master of the Universe, who chose us among all nations to be tortured day and night, to watch as our fathers, our mothers, our brothers end up in the furnaces? Praised be Thy Holy Name, for having chosen us to be slaughtered on Thine altar?” Elie’s previous lens through which he saw the world was instantaneously shattered upon witnessing not only

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