The Lorax And Fahrenheit 451 Comparison

1656 Words 7 Pages
At first glance, it seems strange to compare a children’s book to a dystopian novel, however, revolving around the battle between knowledge and ignorance, the dark dystopia of Fahrenheit 451, written by Ray Bradbury, surprisingly draws many parallels to the children’s book, The Lorax by Dr. Seuss. In Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury depicts a future where ignorant and emotionless masses are bombarded with meaningless media and filled with empty happiness. In this oppressive world, Montag is a fireman whose job is to destroy all books, however, he soon begins to question the society he lives in and turns into an intellectual revolutionary. On the other hand, The Lorax, by Dr. Seuss, follows the story of a greedy businessman, named the Once-ler, who …show more content…
The theme of ignorance is much more fully developed in Fahrenheit 451. Bradbury justifies the ignorance of the entire population through instant gratification, technology, mass exploitation, and minority pressure, however, no such backstory is provided for the Once-ler’s ignorance. Mildred, who represents the population of Fahrenheit 451, and the Once-ler share many similarities and differences. Both Mildred and the Once-ler are antagonists of their stories due to their opposition of the hero. They refuse to listen to Montag or the Lorax respectively when they warn them of their ignorance. Despite their similarities, the Once-ler’s personality is much more developed than Mildred’s. Mildred is described as a “silly empty woman” who is void of ideas, knowledge, and emotion (Bradbury 41). However, the Once-ler is overflowing with ideas and emotion. He is able to see the potential of the Truffula forest and create his innovative Thneed, something which Mildred is too incompetent to accomplish. Overall, the theme of ignorance in Fahrenheit 451 is much more extreme and developed compared to The …show more content…
Seuss, both revolve around the theme of knowledge vs ignorance. Ignorance is best portrayed by Mildred in Fahrenheit 451 and the Once-ler in The Lorax. Both stories employ two main characters to portray the struggle of knowledge and ignorance. Ignorance is represented by Mildred in Fahrenheit 451 and the Once-ler in The Lorax. Mildred is much more incompetent and empty than the Once-ler, illustrating that the effects of ignorance are much more extreme and developed in Fahrenheit 451 than the Lorax. On the other hand, Montag from Fahrenheit 451 and the Lorax from the Lorax both represent knowledge. The struggle between knowledge and ignorance is much more developed in Fahrenheit 451, as shown by Montag’s internal and external struggles, while the conflict is much more simple in The Lorax. Both novels end with a similar lasting message about knowledge and ignorance. The destruction and survival of knowledge in both stories prove that although ignorance may dominate initially, eventually the strength of knowledge will

Related Documents