Chapter Seven: The Life Of Charlemagne By Einhard

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The Life of Charlemagne is an account of Charlemagne’s time as a
Carolingian King by Einhard. Einhard, as with many people, felt that history needed to be written down and preserved or it would be lost and forgotten. The account as a whole is historically significant, but so are the chapters within it. Chapter Seven gives an account of Charlemagne’s war with Saxony. Chapter 28 gives an account of Charlemagne being crowned as Emperor and lastly, chapter 30 talks about Louis the Pious receiving the title of Emperor. Each chapter is historically significant because each can be used as a lens for understanding what occurred after the reign of Charlemagne.
Einhard states that the war with Saxony was the most gruesome, persistent and bitter war the Franks fought. The Franks were in a 33 yearlong battle beginning in 772 with the Saxons who had no regard for human or divine rules. Saxons were devil worshippers and were hostile to any form of Christianity. Einhard says that the war could easily have ended sooner if the Saxons had come to the realization that they were obviously going to be defeated. In instances where it seemed all hope was lost, the Saxons were quick to renounce their beliefs and promise to accept Christianity.
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This is important because it united a previously divided people. It is an example of the long-standing tradition that sharing your better religion and better standards of living with those who are lower on the totem pole. Previously, Pope Boniface had attempted to convert the Saxon people, enlighten them and show them the ways of Christianity, but the result was his death. Through accepting Christianity, the Saxons become essentially equal Frankish people. In a political sense, converting heathens to Christianity was not the most historically significant part. With war comes the conquering of territory. In gaining in Saxon land, Charlemagne consolidated his political

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