The Letter From Birmingham Jail By Martin Luther King Jr.

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The Letter From Birmingham Jail We all are very familiar with who Martin Luther King Jr. is and what he did to end racism for all diversity. He is a hero, who commits an act of remarkably bravery and respected as an admirable freedom fighter with a great courage and strength character. The Letter from Birmingham Jail was written by Martin Luther King Jr. from a solitary confinement cell in Birmingham, Alabama. King was arrested for participating in a peaceful anti-segregation march. The march go back to the segregation laws and policies were play in the role of the Jim Crow system of separate schools, restaurants, and bathrooms for blacks and whites that existed far beyond the slavery era. Martin Luther King Jr. disproves …show more content…
King uses his logic as a method to bypass racial boundaries and ideas that allows him to get his point across the audiences without them putting off his letter as just another attempt for equality. He influences his audiences with his knowledge while he gains a significant amount of respect for his words and ideas. His heroic actions were acted on the four basic steps from the nonviolent campaign that determine whether injustices are alive. These steps are negotiation, self- purification, and direct action. However, none of these steps were occurred in the city of Birmingham. He counters that the white power structure of Birmingham left no other alternatives because of the unbroken violence, continued of the racist practices of locals merchants and the unwillingness of the political leaders to negotiate. This lead him to questioned why people participate in direct actions, sit-in, and marches instead of …show more content…
Martin Luther King Jr. acknowledging his legitimate concern on the nonviolent action, he launched his thought on lawbreaking as a moral act. He justifies on the concept that there are just laws and there are just unjust laws by testing whether a law uplifts or degrades human personality.” an unjust law is a code that a majority inflicts on a minority that is not binding on itself . This is difference made legal. On the other hand, a just law is a code that a majority compels a minority to follow, and that it is willing to follow itself. This is sameness made legal” (King 3). His most powerful point is that no law can considered democratically structured when a minority has not part of creating the law due to discriminatory voting rights and practices. In that case, King made two honest confessions to the audience, his Christian and Jewish brother about how he still held a grudge upon the white moderate; he reached a regrettable conclusion that the white citizen councillor or the Ku Klux Klanner are more devoted to order than to justice. These two confessions are profound of disappointments. During his speech in Birmingham, he preached the situation of the holocaust and compared the mistreatment of the black to the inhumane treatment from the jews. King reminds the people never to forget that everything Hitler did in Germany was “legal” because it was “illegal to aid and comfort a jew in hitler’s Germany. King put himself in a situation if he had to lived in

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