The Lemon Tree Analysis

854 Words 4 Pages
Against the boundaries of states, religion, and beliefs forms a friendship that is continually tested by the turmoil of war and a deep-rooted resentment that has lasted for centuries. In Sandy Tolan’s book The Lemon Tree a narrative is formed around the real-life stories of Bashir Khairi, a Palestinian revolutionary, and Dalia Landau, an Israeli woman who grew up in the Khairi family’s home after it was abandoned. Growing up in separate worlds, Bashir and Dalia cross paths when Bashir journeys to Israel to visit the home built by his father, only to find that the house is now occupied by an immigrant Jewish family. Through their chance meeting, Dalia and Bashir form an unlikely friendship, keeping in touch through letters and visits throughout …show more content…
The history presented shows how and most importantly why Dalia and Bashir take the actions that they do and on a bigger scale shows the motives behind Israelis and Palestinians; “…Yet we are so deeply connected… what connects us? The same thing that separates us. This land” (Tolan 262). On both sides, there is a yearning for the “holy land” derived from past hardships. Dalia is from a destitute Jewish Bulgarian family that narrowly escaped Nazi persecution, while Bashir’s family was forced off their own land by the conflict between the Arabs and Jews. Tolan retells the histories of the families in a way that brings their stories to life ☺ (figurative language). She humanizes both sides, which allows me to view different perspectives and better sympathize with both sides of the story. Even if I do not agree with the actions of a character, the history told behind it gives me an understanding of their thought process. By giving a detailed account of their histories, readers can better understand the reasons behind Dalia and Bashir’s actions and beliefs. For these reasons the addition of history is one part of the book that made it a great …show more content…
During one of their discussions, Dalia has an epiphany; “Your people are holding the key to our true freedom…we hold the key to your freedom. It’s a deep interdependence” (Tolan 260). Throughout the book there are ideas of the people of both sides being interconnected. Without the agreement of one or the other, there can be no peace. Dalia especially learns this lesson. She knows that if the Israelis ignore the pleas and demands of the Palestinians and vice versa, there will be no peace. Throughout their friendship, Dalia tries her best to get Bashir to see that if he rejects the Israeli side, he will not be able to end the conflict. Dalia also discovers that there is no way to make everybody happy and that both sides will have to sacrifice something if they wish to end the conflict. The morals not only present a way in which a peace deal can be brokered but these lessons can also be applied to our everyday lives which is why this was also a great addition to the

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