Lego Movie Globalization

Great Essays
Topic: Combating Corporate Globalization Step-by-step

“Capitalism is the extraordinary belief that the nastiest of men for the nastiest of motives will somehow work for the benefit of all” - John Maynard Keynes (Quote investigator)

Introduction
Multi-national corporations seize their unregulated political power to maximize profit via unfair trade agreements and deregulating financial derivatives at the expense of human rights and tax paid by the general public. Corporate globalization reduces restrictions on the people who are already rich and powerful, and strengthens the walls which imprison the poorest and the most vulnerable, which is plainly an immoral fact. This large contrast between rich and poor in terms of quality of life is not
…show more content…
This dark side is reflected in many ways, showing an inequality between different classes. For instance, a corporation could hire workers and force them to work from dawn till dusk every day and lock them in stores as if they were slaves. More generally, business elites, representing a minority in their society, can have the authority to manipulate the weak and powerless majority which are primarily the “victims” of corporate globalization.
Similarly, the Lego Movie primarily portrays the conflict between business tycoons and victims of corporate psychopaths. It begins with the evil Lord Business (the President), who perceives the Lego World as a chaotic place and plans to manipulate people with “Kragle”. However, an ordinary Lego character Emmet who is prophesied as “The Special” has an outstanding caliber to motivate a “Master Builder Army” for combating the Lord Business by “Piece of Resistant” – the powerful weapon against “Kragle”.

The False Legitimacy of Corporate
…show more content…
The Lego Movie successfully shows how powerful business elites manipulate the weak and powerless people by brainwashing and victimizing them. It is not rare to see that tyrannical Lord Business encourages people’s unquestioning obedience to authority and a suppression of individual freedom. For instance, Lord Business brainwashes his people to get their reward by obeying his regulations, and even delivers a message that it is “good and normal” to drink overpriced coffee. Like the song “Everything Is Awesome”, the story demonstrates that the corporate’s world will be perfect if everyone follows the instruction manuals. The film succeeds in reflecting how corporate globalization indoctrinates people with corporations’ own beliefs. In the movie, Lord Business claims to “bring peace and perfection” in order to destroy the world by using Kragle. Similar to Lord Business in The Lego Movie, corporations claim to assist poor countries in developing local economy, but they engage in “bullying, assassinations of local authority, contamination in natural environment and abusive supervision”, concealing the real motive of maximizing profit from those Less-Developed Countries (Amanda et al. 2011, p.21-23). If something is out of their control, the corporations will seize their unregulated power to stop or change it. In the movie, Emmet is interrogated by Lord Business’ lieutenant,

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The Industrial Revolution, a phenomenon that made America the world power it is today. Luminaries like Andrew Carnegie, Henry Ford, and J. P Morgan, men who built the foundations of the industrial age; used cutthroat tactics, double-crossed their allies, and pushed the blue-collar workers to the brink. These men created an empire that overworked the working class, while justifying it by saying, laissez-faire, or “let it be,” causing the government to back down, because it would cause for an inefficient economy. Their primary motivation was to make a profit. They abused the system to the point where the government had to step in; creating the FDA, Unions, and other countless restrictions.…

    • 773 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The issue of inequality exists on a global platform and touches on all facets our lives. The power to accumulate and redistribute wealth is with the wealthy elite that can manipulate markets at will, however, Stiglitz clearly defines the dangers of such to society, “…there are two ways to become wealthy: to create wealth or to take wealth away from others. The former adds to society. The latter typically subtracts from it…” (Stiglitz 396). The blame cannot be placed on the lower classes when there poverty is a direct result of faulty and deceptive practices carried out by corporations.…

    • 1859 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    1984 Dystopian Technology

    • 1060 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Party is able to oppress its citizens through the use of modern technology as well as its thinking expertise. Improved surveillance also allows Big Brother to keep his eyes constantly fixed upon the actions of thought criminals to lead to their vaporization. By the limited language of the Party as well as the Ministry of Truth as a whole, the Party obtains complete power over its citizens by censoring the information they are able to perceive. Technological progression allows the dystopian government of Oceania to optimally modify the lives of its citizens in a negative…

    • 1060 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Drawing on Plato’s Republic, Frank’s actions were that of a tyrant because they were unlawful and the actions focused on achieving only his self-interest through power. The difficulty Frank faced throughout the show was the ability to act unjustly while appearing to be just to the public. A specific example from the show is Federal Emergency Management Agency and America Works his job program, he seized money from the F.E.M.A. fund to allocate that money…

    • 1342 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    During the 20th century labor unions did destroy the free market by encumbering businesses with regulations essentially penalizing the wealthy for being successful. Reasons such as the Haymarket affair, the Pullman strike, the homestead strike, socialism, progressives, and the A.F.L caused labor unions to destroy the free market. Conflict between unions and management has caused struggle for power in the U.S. Labor unions gave an effort for better wages, reasonable hours and safer working conditions, while the wealthy were economically taking advantage of the workers to improve their wealth. To begin with, labor unions did destroy the free market by setting up strikes. One well known strike of the 20th century that aided labor unions to destroy the free market is the Haymarket affair.…

    • 992 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Henry Demarest Lloyd argues that the operations of monopolies are detrimental to the people. Lloyd explains that a monopoly is used to control aspects of the business, which generates a profit for a select few. Business owners are legally allowed to reduce production and increase prices in order to sustain a high demand for their product. Ultimately so businesses get the most and give the least. Lloyd appeals to his audience by exposing the negative side of monopolies.…

    • 582 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In a way I could agree with William Dugger that we should blame the government but blame the corruptions for our bad economy but after analyzing Duggers article I would say that the government in a way is to blame but its not their fault that the economy is bad today but I would say that they are at fault for letting these conglomerate corporations to have so much power that they were able to create their own culture and were able to create their own capital market. According to William Dugger we must be able to point out these issues before they get out of hand because now the powers that these corporations have are not even seen as power but rather we see this new power that they have used to usher us into a new era and now we and especially they youth are seeing this new era as something good, Dugger states “We have allowed a Frankenstein monster to be put together and made…

    • 1199 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Corporations are a vital need in today’s global society. People need corporations due to the global scale of trade and supply and demand of all products. Yes we need corporations, but laws should be implemented to limit their control of power. Corporations make a lot of money and in doing so they look at the bigger picture. In other words: corporations break laws to gain a much larger profit and if they get caught they just pay a fine with their much large profits, and this means nothing to them because they can more than afford small fines.…

    • 1544 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    DBQ: The Progressive Era

    • 2007 Words
    • 9 Pages

    For example, as the Washington Post Cartoon illustrates, Teddy Roosevelt, the president of the United States, could destroy bad trusts and detain the good ones [Doc A]. The Washington Post Cartoon is directed toward an audience of businesses, informing them that the role of the federal government is to regulate organizations and that the government should be more powerful. However, it is only the bad trusts that are creating problems, while the good trusts are imposing no threat to the people. In response to the increasing power of businesses, President Theodore Roosevelt implemented a new domestic policy, known as the ‘Square Deal’. Through this policy, Roosevelt advocated control over consumer protection, corporations, and the conservation of natural resources.…

    • 2007 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Super Size Me represents an example of a work that both circumvents and reinforces the tenets of corporate capitalism. Morgan Spurlock uses the grotesque human body in his film in order to address excessive consumption and the facilitation of this consumption by capitalism. However, in doing so, he inevitably uses capitalism as a tool to promote his message, creating a paradox Ross Singer dubs a “commodified form of cinematic dissent” (150). The irony of protesting capitalism through capitalism still has the potential to result in widespread viewership and subsequent activism. Indeed, Spurlock uses this method effectively in Super Size Me.…

    • 1469 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays