The Law Of Morality In Mere Christianity By C. S. Lewis

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C.S. Lewis begins his novel Mere Christianity by discussing the Law of Human Nature and various other laws that are important to his discussion. Lewis states that people must be aware of a Law or Rule of fair play or else there would be much more quarrelling among humans. This Rule or Law used to be known as the Law of Nature; however, laws of nature today will usually refer to things such as gravitation, heredity, or the laws of chemistry (Lewis, 4). The Law of Nature, when concerning issues of right and wrong, is more correctly referred to as the Law of Human Nature today. People will argue that this Law of Nature is fraudulent because they believe that different ages have had different moralities, but Lewis claims that moral teachings throughout …show more content…
Moral Law is the force that causes humans to choose the first of the two aforementioned impulses, but Lewis makes the distinction that the Moral Law is not, in fact, an instinct. Chapter three is a fairly short section of this book, but a main point of it is that safety and happiness can only exist when people are fair and kind to each other, which is one of the most important truths in the world according to Lewis. He continues in the book and discusses the three main views on the universe: materialist, religious and Life-Force. People with the materialist view believe that the universe just happened to exist and that humanity came into being by chance. The religious view states that there is a mind (not necessarily God) behind the universe that brought everything into existence. The Life-Force philosophy claims that life evolved due to the purposiveness of said Life-Force; however, Lewis simply debunks this view at the end of the chapter. Now that a higher power has come into play, Lewis begins to make the argument that this being must be …show more content…
Lewis starts off book two by dividing humanity into two groups: the majority which believes in either God or gods and the minority who do not believe in any higher powers. The second important split that Lewis employs is the kind of God people believe in. The first idea is that He is beyond good and evil which is known as Pantheism. People that think this theory to be true perceive that everything is good in one way and bad in another. The second view is that God is righteous, He loves love and hates hatred, He is a God that desires for us to act in a certain way and not in another (Lewis 36). Pantheists believe that God is the universe and anything in it is part of Him; meanwhile, Christians believe that God created the universe. Lewis continues from there and tackles the age-old question, “If a good God made the world why has it gone wrong?” (Lewis 38). His explanation for this is that if the universe truly was so cruel and unjust and completely void of any meaning, humanity should have never found out about this lack of meaning. Lewis says that he believes in Christianity because it, as well as reality, are very complicated, odd and not what you could guess. Next, he looks at two views that try to explain humans living in a bad universe. The first is the Christian view which discusses that this is a good world; however, it has gone wrong and the second view is Dualism which explains that there are two equal and independent powers in the universe. Lewis quickly

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