The Latin American Crisis In Guatemala And The Cold War

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Prior to the Cold War that took place from 1947 to 1991 in various parts of Europe, Latin America and the United States, the United States had established and extended the Monroe Doctrine that had previously warned Europeans against retaking their former colonies. When the U.S. decided to extend this doctrine, they put it in a Cold War context, in which it allowed the U.S. to strengthen Latin American states militarily against communist penetration. Because of North America’s long and hysterical fear of communism, the country had decided to invade governments in Latin America that showed any sign of Soviet influence and ideals. With many revolutionary ideas during this time period, in a way Guatemala had incidentally initiated the Cold War …show more content…
To begin, during the Great Export Boom from the years 1870-1930, Guatemala heavily began to export coffee, building acres and acres of land in which indigenous people worked on for very little pay. Guatemala did not solely depend on coffee though, during the 1880s and beyond, the United Fruit Company (UFC) formed many banana republics in Honduras, Guatemala and so forth. This company in fact had more economic power than the governments in the countries they were operating in. The UFC created company towns with U.S. engineers, managers and so forth to manage the business and they set up U.S.-like neighborhoods consisting of similar North American cars, houses and schools in to feel more at home. Although this U.S. company prospered greatly, little pay and poor housing for the natives that worked on these plantations marked one of the many injustices created by the banana company. One reformer in particular who wanted to change these injustices was President Jacobo Arbenz, Guatemala’s second reformist president. He wished for big changes for his country and one move he took was confiscating large estates and dividing them up for peasant cultivators …show more content…
attempted to overthrow was Cuba. The 1959 Cuban Revolution led by Fidel Castro was merely one of the first defeats of U.S. foreign policy in Latin America. After the implementation of several economic reforms by Cuba 's government, the U.S. trade restrictions on Cuba increased. The U.S. discontinued Cuban sugar imports and refused to supply the country with much needed oil, creating a devastating effect on Cuba’s economy. In March of 1960, President Dwight D. Eisenhower authorized the CIA to organize and train Cuban refugees as guerrilla forces in order to overthrow Castro, which led to the Bay of Pigs Invasion. Because Cuba was suffering economically, the country began trade relations with Soviet Union. After this horrific event of communism, President John F. Kennedy attempted to implement the 1961 Alliance for Progress, which was similar to previous Marshall Plan in which it ”..reduce[d] revolutionary pressures by stimulating development and political reform”(pg 287). Unfortunately, this alliance quickly ran out of steam. Leaving the U.S. and Latin America with unresolved negative

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