The Labeling Theory Of Crime Case Study

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The labeling theory is the concept of folks who committed deviant behavior as result, he or she labeled base on the offense. As we will discuss in more details below, some scholars are skeptical of the labeling theory and accentuate that it would not be as affective and perhaps may cause individuals to engage in deviant behavior. In contrast, conflict theory mostly focusses on social issues and the lack of economic opportunity for everyone throughout the nation. Also, as mentioned below transparency and equality for all should to be a priority to tackle inequality. All too often, governmental officials failed to represent the public which is part of the problem leading to disparity. In order to fix these issues, we must start by reforming the …show more content…
Scholars also realized that some that of invention is needed to reduce crime, particularly rehabilitation, incapacitation, and perhaps fear is often a necessary tool in an effort to reduce criminality. “Scholars embraced the labeling theory of crime, however, attack this line of reasoning vigorously” (Lilly, 2015). To analyze this issue, I see why scholars have very little faith or perhaps skeptical that the labeling theory would be effective at all. Moreover, “they caution that rather than diminishing criminal involvement, state intervention---labeling and reacting to offenders as “criminals” and “ex-felons” ---can have the anticipated and ironic consequence of deepening the very behavior it was meant to halt’ (Lilly, …show more content…
While looking at this from a different angle, it makes sense as to why scholars are concern regarding labeling theory. Two of my younger siblings who did not make good choices growing up as a child, and both of them are consistently in and out of jail. This is a personal issue to me as it involved people I care about. Both of my brothers have minor charges which are marijuana and other unfortunate choices which ended up being felonies on their record. Let me be clear that, and I am not defending them because they are my family and to be quite honest, I do believe that people should obey the the law. Moreover, they aren’t child molester nor did they ever killed anyone or committed a bank robbery. Sadly, and all too often, they get treated as such. I remember recently having a conversation with them, and as any reasonable person would do, I was trying to encourage them to turn they life around by making better choices. They both explained to me what is it like to have a felony record is very difficult and nearly impossible not become a career criminal. In addition, neither of them will qualify nor able to rent an apartment complex due to felony record and obviously in the eyes of the law as they are treated as such. In fact, a lot of places would not hire them, and what is more shocking, not even the

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