The King's Speech Critical Analysis

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Such is nature of discovery, it involves journeys that are transformative and concerns one’s relationship with one’s self or indeed the world around them. Discoveries can be either sought or serendipitous but ultimately they are concerned with the acquisition of a broadened understanding, the development of values and changing of perspectives. Director Tom Hooper’s ’The King’s Speech’ explores the transformative nature of discovery arising due to necessity resulting in emotional discoveries. Similarly, Moshin Hamid’s novel ‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist’ also explores the transformations experienced through discoveries however does so by examining the sudden, confronting discoveries made throughout. It is through different aspects of discoveries …show more content…
The entire novel is a dramatic monologue meaning we not only hear the voice of the speaker, and only of the speaker, but that voice creates a scene. However the use of such a technique can be used to inflict bias upon the story line, something that the narrator himself touches on when he says ‘It is the thrust of one’s narrative that counts, not the accuracy of one’s details’. The dramatic monologue is an effective choice for Hamid who wants audiences to make their own discovery. As Changez's voice goes on, more is learnt about the situation and through this different readers come to different conclusions, according to their own contexts and values. A sudden, self-discovery occurs on the part of the speaker when he discovers that post 9/11, all he was told of America was not reality. ‘I had always thought of America as a nation that looked forward; for the first time I was struck by its determination to look back’. By personifying the nation of America with human qualities, it helps to relate america’s ideas and vales to readers, allowing Hamid to convey his views of America and the morals of this quote more effectively. Such a sudden revelation forces audiences into reassessing their views and in doing so create new …show more content…
His voice is his sense of self and once discovered restores both his self-confidence and society’s faith in such a great time of need. In the closing scene, the viewers see a medium-close up of Bertie, now King George VI, with a low viewpoint so he appears larger, more confident and more in control. When the speech begins, quick cuts of families and citizens are shown receiving the speech through their radios, taking comfort in the words of their king. After completing the speech the scene is transformed into a direct juxtaposition of the opening scene with the colour scheme becoming brighter and both Bertie’s posture and demeanour presenting a confident man. The consequences of King George VI actions catalysed emotional transformations which provided him at the time and now modern day audiences with the opportunity to view the situation in different ways through the discovery of his

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