Khmer Rouge In Cambodia

1201 Words 5 Pages
Khmer Rouge was one of the many leaders of the Cambodian people. He was a member of the communist party who came into office during Cambodia’s struggle against French colonization. After the first Indochina war in the 1950s, the communist movement in Cambodia began to form. Before Rouge took office, small battles had taken place. In 1970, Marshal Lon Nol, a Cambodian leader, began to battle Rouge and the Vietnamese army he had backing him. Two years later, the Vietnamese turned the fight over to the communist party who then got assistance from the US to drop bombs over Cambodia. By 1973, most of Cambodia was in the hands of Khmer Rouge. By 1975, Rouge had control of all of Cambodia once Phnom Penh, a large city in Cambodia, fell to communist …show more content…
During this transition, thousands of people died. Under the Rouge regime, they attempted to create a classless society by abolishing money, public transportation,schools, churches, government buildings, and more. Instead, they turned those things into prisons, and education camps. In these camps and prisons thousands were killed and tortured. “The most important prison in Cambodia, known as S-21, held approximately 14,000 prisoners while in operation. Only about 12 survived” (Khmer Rouge History). One of the main groups of people that are still being impacted by that genocide is those who were in their twenties during the 1970s who would now be about 60 years old. The reason this age group is so important is because this was that age group that was trying to start families during the time that the genocide occurred. Because of the terrible conditions that people had to endure, like malnutrition and the camps, fertility and marriage rates began to plummet.Shortly after the end of the Rouge regime those numbers began to rise …show more content…
One of the most prominent things that the results showed was that hardly anyone had moved since after the Vietnamese had taken over. The table shows that 63 percent of people were forced to move while Rouge was in power. 80 percent of those who moved after the Rouge period, during the Vietnamese period, said that is was due to reparation. 19 percent of participants say that they were forced to move and torn away from their families as a result of these events. “This implies that more than one in four forced moves was accompanied by family separation” (Zimmer

Related Documents