Women's Club In The 19th Century

Improved Essays
One evening in 1887, a small group of women gathered together in the home of Nora Jones. The group met in her home to have a Bible study. The conversation quickly shifted from the planned bible study to current events. They soon began to cover a wide array of local and national events in their informal meetings. The group began to grow as more and more women wanted to be in the club where women were discussing the local and world news. This was the humble beginning of the Kearney Woman’s Club. Throughout time the club went through many changes in name and location but they always stayed true to two ideals; women deserve to be treated fairly and that a community deserves to be treated well.
After the small group of friends expanded in 1887
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The name was inspired by a quote by Victor Hugo who said, “the 19th century is preeminently the Women's Age." In this year they also join the General Federation of Woman’s Club, a national organization formed in 1890, “dedicated to community women’s organization dedicated to community improvement by enhancing the lives of others through volunteer service.” This change was inspired by the club beginning to align themselves more with the Nebraska State Federation Clubs. These groups, including the 19th Century Club focused on women’s suffrage, culture, and education. The groups wanted to focus on creating well-rounded women. Rebecca Hamer, was the group’s first president. The meetings were at Jones’ home but she had no desire to lead such a large group. Harmer was leading a meeting the evening it was announced that Kearney won the spot for the Normal School in 1903. The women were quite excited and it was described that, “a shower of handkerchiefs, umbrellas, etc. gave evidence of the existing enthusiasm.” The women wanted the community to flourish and were active volunteers throughout their time as a club. They celebrated their growth in 1904 with a banquet at the Midway Hotel. The group celebrated with a meal and a speaker who said that the club would always be there’s. She used a metaphor of the Woman’s Club as a doll that had to have part of it replaced. …show more content…
Elizabeth Saxton, spoke at a gathering of the club. She gave a speech titled “Equality of Women Before Law" to the Kearney area women. This was not the only notable speaker that the club had through the years. It is believed that Susan B. Anthony may have spoken with the club as she stayed in Grand Island for two months. There are no record to show that she visited just word of mouth. Nellie Bly, the woman who went around the world in less than 80 days, also may have spoken with the women. While her actual meetings with the 19th Century Club were not recorded, Maude Burrows was able to get an interview with her for the Kearney Hub. The club invited notable Nebraskan’s author Willa Cather to attend a meeting and she came and

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