Freedom In The Story Of An Hour

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In Kate Chopin’s short story, “The Story of An Hour”, our main character deals with the joy of happiness for her newfound freedom when she finds out her husband died. Most women in her situation would fear for the future without a husband but Mrs. Mallard felt “fresh and alive” (235). Why is she so relieved that her husband died? Does this mean that she is a cruel woman? Although the character shows signs of insensitivity, she is actually someone many can sympathize with mainly because of independence, the author’s narration and the hidden message behind her heart troubles.
The thought of independence is viewed as a forbidden pleasure that should not be spoken of. When Mrs. Mallard finds herself faintly saying, “free, free, free.” (235) this terrifies her, so much that she tries to “beat it back with her will” (235). Mrs. Mallard opposes this feeling because she knows that she should not think of something so inconceivable. The story never gives an exact period of time but it could be anywhere from the 1800s to the 1900s. During these times women were bound by one man and their main job consisted of taking care of their husband and children, but Mrs. Mallard did not want that life. Secretly she wanted a life where she was free to herself
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The lost of one's hopes and dreams can be a delicate thing to grasps so when Mr. Mallard snatched it out of her hands by showing up alive her heart was broken and killed her. Chopin way of describing how scared Mrs. Mallard was at facing her truth actually made her someone anyone can relate to but it also gives us some depth on how forbidden that pleasure is. Something so untouchable like her independence and freedom was rare and for her to have seen it at all was a miracle. While reading a story like this you learn to not take everything for granted because someone else might not have that leisure like you

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